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Category: Giving Back

How do you want to leave your financial legacy?

How do you want to leave your financial legacy?

Planning for the future is important for everyone, but it’s especially important if you or someone you care about has dementia. That’s why we’ve partnered with RBC Wealth Management Estate & Trust Services to bring you a series of informative blogs about estate planning.

In this blog, Leanne Kaufman, Head of RBC Estate & Trust Services, asks ‘What kind of financial legacy do you want to leave behind?’

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CarePartners has taken action for dementia!

CarePartners has taken action for dementia!

With over 200,000 people in Ontario living with dementia today, we need an Ontario dementia strategy to make sure that our communities receive the support they need. The Alzheimer Society of Ontario has led the movement to have a fully-funded dementia strategy included in the Ontario government’s 2017 budget, and we are now awaiting the upcoming announcement of the budget.

In support of our initiative, CarePartners has generously donated not only financially, but their time as well, to help build awareness and promote the importance of an Ontario Dementia Strategy. With their exceptional support, we have been able to increase awareness amongst policy makers and influencers and the need for a strategy to be included in this year’s budget.

The partnership between CarePartners and the Alzheimer Society of Ontario began with the shared value of great care for people living with dementia. CarePartners explains,

“CarePartners is committed to providing quality care for patients with a dementia diagnosis living in the community and to providing support for their families. Our partnership with the ASO (Alzheimer Society of Ontario) provides our health professionals with education and access to resources; both of these contribute greatly to ensuring that the care our staff provides is always skilled, compassionate and built on proven best practices.”
-Brittany Robins, CarePartners

To have an Ontario Dementia Strategy will be integral to help support partnerships like this, which help to make sure that people with dementia receive the best care possible.

Thanks to supporters like CarePartners, we have been able to raise awareness about the need for a dementia strategy to many members of parliament, but we need to make sure that a fully-funded strategy is incorporated in the government’s budget. Be sure to write to your MPP today and tell them that we need a fully-funded dementia strategy!

For more information about CarePartners and the services they offer, visit their website at www.carepartners.ca

Puzzles for Good supports the Alzheimer Society

Puzzles for Good supports the Alzheimer Society

By: Kirsten Wreggitt, Chief Puzzle Constructor at Puzzles for Good

My Grandma made me pancakes in the shape of anything I could imagine – giraffes, Mickey Mouse, unicorns, and of course full moons. Those childhood breakfasts are cherished memories of family gathered together with Grandma at the center in her frilly apron. I remember that she laughed easily, always had a lap for you to sit in, and that she loved frogs. Of course, Kermit the Frog was her favourite, but I remember he was among many friends in the room I slept in at her house. That bedroom was filled with frog figurines on shelves covering each wall. There was no doubt that she was a fun loving person; a pretty perfect Grandma and a wonderful wife and mother too.

That is how I want to remember her, spatula in hand laughing with us at breakfast. Unfortunately, we also had to witness a slow and painful decline until we lost her to Alzheimer’s. At first she simply misplaced things or forgot a meeting, but over time it progressed to forgetting people, forgetting how to care for herself, and finally forgetting who she was. Such a terrible loss.

Many of us joke about forgetfulness and old age. I wish Alzheimer’s stopped with a little forgetfulness. The final stages of Alzheimer’s are no joke and it would be a wonderful thing if no other families had to witness or experience this loss of a loved one.

I am the owner of Puzzles for Good. It’s a social enterprise that creates word puzzles and shares the proceeds with organizations doing great work in the world.

I hold the memory of my Grandma dear to my heart and so I picked the Alzheimer Society of Canada as the recipient for this month’s puzzle pack.

Puzzles are great for brain health and are also so much fun! Get your Memory Puzzle Pack here.

Their memories fade, but love remains

Their memories fade, but love remains

Donate today to help find a cure.

When the doctor first told my Mom, “You have Alzheimer’s disease,” I was numb. There I was, only 30 years old, with a newborn son and a mother whose memory was starting to fade.  I tried to Google as much as I could about the disease, but panic came the second I saw the words: There is no cure.

As hard as this is to talk about, I agreed to share my story with you because I want to see a world without Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

Caron & Marlene

Please make a donation today. Your holiday gift to Alzheimer Society of Ontario will help fund life-saving research focused on prevention, better treatments and, ultimately, a cure. Your contribution will also help women and men across the province that face this devastating disease by providing support programs and services.

This time of year is especially hard. I have such fond memories of our family’s special Christmas traditions but that has all changed since Alzheimer’s took hold of Mom 15 years ago.

My Mom is now in the late stages of the disease. She has forgotten how to walk and is confined to a wheelchair. She can’t remember how to chew so even eating is difficult.

Alzheimer’s disease impacts so many people. And chances are you or someone you know will be affected.

I hope you will join me in donating now to help bring hope and improve the lives of people like my mother.

Thank you,

Caron Leid
Caregiver to my mom, Marlene, since 2000

Make a Will Month – What gifts can I give?

Make a Will Month – What gifts can I give?

November is Make a Will month in Canada – and this is my sixth and final blog post here for the Alzheimer Society. I would like to thank them so much for this incredible opportunity.  The work being done by the Alzheimer Society is incredible and so needed. Hopefully one day there will be a cure for this horrible disease. Now on to my post.

The law in Ontario is pretty wide open with regards to giving gifts of property in a Will.  You have almost complete discretion.  The vast majority of my married clients leave all of their property to their spouse with a gift over to their children with a further gift over to their grandchildren.  They often will pick out specific gifts to give to specific people.  This is not a required way to do things, it is just the most common.

In addition, my clients will often choose to give charitable gifts to registered charitable organizations like the Alzheimer Society, in order to take advantage of very favourable tax breaks the Canadian government provides.

When you speak to a lawyer or the planned giving departments of charitable organizations like the Alzheimer Society they can talk you through the various ways and the many benefits of including charitable giving in your Will.

When you have decided who is going to get what property, there are certain things you should keep in mind.

First, you are required to provide for your dependents. If you do not, the dependant has the right to bring a court action to essentially rewrite the Will. The court will look at the overall regime set up in the estate, and will only uphold a Will if it is of the opinion that it has sufficiently provided for the dependents.

Second, if a spouse is not satisfied with a Will, he or she can decide to ask for an equalization of property instead of taking under your Will.  This will likely thwart any plan to leave a spouse out of your inheritance.  It is therefore important to ensure that your spouse is reasonably provided for in your Will.

Third, there are ways to minimize your taxes, by structuring certain trusts, and appointing on your Life Insurance Policies and Designating Beneficiaries under certain registered plans like RRSPs and RRIFs.

Fourth – if your beneficiary might qualify for Disability Benefits under the Ontario Disability Support Program, there are certain trust options that are available, that can allow the beneficiary to continue receiving government assistance after receiving an inheritance.  Often people give gifts to disabled beneficiaries without taking into account the impact it will have on their government benefits.

Certain religions have specific requirements for gifts given in a Will. In most cases, those requirements can be met as long as dependents are looked after and the spouse does not elect equalization. Some religions have specific workarounds that are accepted by the religious authorities. Those items I defer to the religious leaders, but it is important for you to ask the question if that is important to you.

Other than that, there is pretty wide freedom for you to decide who gets what after your death. This freedom only exists if you take the time to make a Will. The alternative is for a government formula to decide who gets your property. It might work out the way you wish. It might not.

You do not need a lawyer to make your Will. There are online forms that you can fill out. That said, a lawyer can help guide you through the process in simple and easy to understand way.  A lawyer can make suggestions as to the most tax effective way to structure things. A lawyer will keep up with changes in the law as they occur to assist in making sure that your documents are up to date. A lawyer will make sure that you have not forgotten important things.

The process is NOT as expensive or time consuming as you may be imagining. The time and money invested in these documents such as your Will and Powers of Attorney is well spent; clients gain clarity and peace of mind.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about making your Will and Powers of Attorney. Finally, I would like to thank Sadie Etemad for her assistance in putting together these blog posts.

 

Written by:

Stephen Offenheim

Stephen Offenheim,
The Law Office of Stephen Offenheim
http://www.planyourwill.ca
(416) 863-1300
steve@planyourwill.ca

It’s easier than you think to be a superhero! Make your Will today.

It’s easier than you think to be a superhero! Make your Will today.

Make Your Will Today!

 

At the Alzheimer Society, we believe completing your Will and Powers of Attorney for Personal Care and Property makes you a Super Hero. Why? You are putting the needs of others before yourself and protecting what’s important.

Death and taxes – two certainties?

While working at Royal Trust as a Will and estate planner, many clients would sit in a chair across from me and blurt out … there are two certainties in life:  death and taxes.  For years, even centuries, such statements were met with resignation.

However, most Canadians may be surprised to learn there is a way to avoid taxes. It all depends on the wording of your Will.  Did you know that you can help your favourite charity and help your estate save taxes?  How?

The Rules

When you donate to your favourite charity, like the Alzheimer Society of Ontario in your Will, the donation is considered to be made immediately before your death.  Similar rules apply when you name charitable organizations as the beneficiary of your RRSP, RRIF or TFSA, or of a life insurance policy.  On your final tax return, your Executor can claim all charitable donations made in the year of your death.  These include donations in the Will and those directly transferred to charities from RRSPs, RRIFs, TFSAs, or life insurance policies, and any carried forward donations from the previous five years that were not claimed, to a maximum of 100% of your net income.  Any excess can be claimed on the tax return for the previous year, again to a maximum of 100% of your net income for that year.

Depending upon your net income in the year of death and the previous year, and the total donation amount, taxes paid in the year before your death may be rebated and taxes owed in the year of death may be eliminated.

What?  Taxes eliminated and rebated?

So let’s see how that works!

The Government Rewards YOU!

TAX ELIMINATION AND A REBATE TOO!

Mr. Generous gives a charitable Will bequest in his Will  totaling =                        $50,000
Tax payable—Final year:

Mr. Generous’ net income in year of his death =

 

$40,000

Minus: Tax credit for donation (100% x $40,000 net income) =

$10,000 to be used against previous years taxes

$40,000
Tax payable =             $  0,000.00
Previous year:

Mr. Generous’ net income in year before death =

 

$  36,000

Tax paid in previous year = (assuming 35% rate x $36,000) = 12,600
Donation carried back to previous year

($50,000 bequest – $40,000 tax credit used in final year) =

 

$  10,000

Taxable income = $36,000 – $10,000 donation = $  26,000
Tax payable (assuming 35% rate x $26,000) = $   9,100
Taxes rebated to estate ($12,600 – $9,100) =            $  3,500
Benefits:

The tax for the year of death has been eliminated. The tax for the previous year, which had already been paid, is reduced and rebated.

 

Imagine the social impact – if all Canadians did their Wills (only 50% of us do) and included a charitable bequest in their Wills! Giving to a charity like the Alzheimer Society in your Will would benefit our world significantly while ensuring that your estate eliminates unnecessary tax burdens – a win – win!

November is Make a Will Month.  And this month YOU could be our Super Hero!   By doing your Will and including a charitable gift you can save taxes, protect those you care about and help save the world from dementia!    Act now!  Click here to request your free Estate Planner and Guide or call Kristy Cutten at 416-847-8915.

 

Written by:

Colleen Bradley

Colleen Bradley
Chief Development Officer, Planned Giving
Alzheimer Society of Ontario

 

Make a Will Month – This is personal for me

Make a Will Month – This is personal for me

A few months ago, my cousin posted a wonderful video of my grandparents’ 50th wedding anniversary. The year was 1994. My grandfather gave a wonderful, heartfelt speech about what his wife meant to him. The family did skits making fun of the onion sandwich he ordered on their first date. There was even Karaoke. Good times.

Alex & Clara dancing at their wedding.
Pictured above: Alex & Clara Offenheim at their 50th wedding anniversary.

While the first 50 years of marriage were wonderful for my grandparents, the years that followed for them and for our family were extremely challenging. Shortly after this celebration, my grandfather Alexander was diagnosed with a form of dementia. With his loyal wife Clara by his side, he slowly deteriorated over a 10-year period. It was absolutely heartbreaking watching a man with such wit, and intellect slowly become someone else.

Then shortly after my grandfather passed away, my grandmother was diagnosed with a form of dementia. She is now well into her 90s, and has maintained all of her class and dignity. It has been so difficult for our family to go through this more than one time.

That said we are so lucky that my grandparents had the foresight to prepare. While they had the capacity to do so, they both had prepared their Will and powers of attorney. Everything was set up in accordance with their wishes. The Will appointed executors and beneficiaries for their property. A power of attorney appointed family members to act as their substitute decision maker for matters of property and for matters of personal care.

By taking the time to do so, our family avoided the expensive court procedures associated with guardianship applications. There was no need to purchase expensive insurance or bonds that would have been required had the documents not been in place. We have saved money on lawyers, and saved so much of the aggravation and heartache that goes along with unplanned estates.

This is why I was so thrilled when the Alzheimer Society asked me to guest blog for Make a Will month. I am so passionate about making sure that people have the proper documentation in place. I know firsthand how important this is.

Over the course of this month, I will be providing you with information about what goes into making a Will. What are the things you need to consider? What are some of the traps you can fall into? If there is one message I would like send out to everyone, is that doing these documents CANNOT WAIT. It is way too important.

You may be thinking that doing a Will is expensive and time-consuming. Fees can vary greatly depending on the complexity of your Will and where you live. For example, for a straight forward Will, my law firm charges $399 for a Will and two powers of attorney, with a full consultation with a lawyer. ($699 for a couple). And it does not take very long. Most of my clients take about 3-5 hours in total to complete everything that needs to be done.

Completing these documents is so necessary. Please don’t delay; if you need information right away, there are a number of ways to reach me.
Call me now at (416) 863-1300.
Or send me an e-mail now at steve@planyourwill.ca
Or follow this link to set up a free 15 minute phone consultation or a 2 hour Will instruction session.

Thank you for taking the time to read this and I hope you come back during the month of November to read important information for doing your estate plans. Your reward? Getting into action to protect your family, your assets, and gain peace of mind.

 

Written by:

Stephen Offenheim

Stephen Offenheim,
The Law Office of Stephen Offenheim
http://www.planyourwill.ca
(416) 863-1300
steve@planyourwill.ca

“Back up” leading research and make double the impact

“Back up” leading research and make double the impact

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Our minds are like our body’s computer – storing precious memories we’ve collected throughout our lifetime. Sadly, when you have Alzheimer’s disease, every memory, thought and feeling you’ve ever experienced is at risk of being lost.

Your support of research will help “back up” these memories at risk.

Currently, Alzheimer’s disease has no known cure, but great strides are being made into discovering what causes this disease, what types of medication or actions we can take to reduce our risk and how best to approach finding a cure.

Make a donation in support of research today and your gift will be matched 2X its value, thanks to a special match offer from the Decker family. For every dollar you donate, the Decker family will match your gift – up to $25,000.

Alzheimer Society of Ontario has led the way to some fascinating research projects across the province. Research like that being done by Eva Vico Varela.

research-15-eva-varco
Eva Vico Varela (pictured above), neuroscience research student at McGill University

Eva, a neuroscience doctoral student at McGill University, is investigating deep brain stimulation in mice models. She aims to understand how electrical pulses could be applied to help people with Alzheimer’s disease in clinical trials.

If successful, this new treatment could help slow the decline of Alzheimer’s disease and improve the quality of life for people living with dementia. And this is just one of many promising research projects underway right now!

Don’t let dementia erase memories of those you love. Donate now to “back up” leading researchers, caregivers, and people living with dementia.

 

Sharing a cup of support

Sharing a cup of support

beans

Holly Kotowich and Penny Leclair, employees at Pullan Kammerloch Frohlinger Lawyers, have hosted Coffee Break® events at their workplace since 2007. “We host a Coffee Break event every year because we have staff and employers who deal with Alzheimer’s disease. Every year, it seems we learn somebody close to us has dealt with Alzheimer’s,” says Holly.

Coffee Break events can be hosted at your workplace, home, school or anywhere you can serve coffee. Holly says hosting a Coffee Break increases awareness about Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias in her workplace. And better yet, it’s so easy to do!

Holly and Penny take over the office’s lunch room table on their event day, and set up coffee, dainties and donation boxes. “We ask a couple people for assistance and a lot of them help with baking. We have everything set up all day, and the event just runs itself,” says Holly.

The Alzheimer Society sets you up with a Coffee Break® kit that includes posters, coasters, a donation box, event tips, coffee cup cut-outs and more. “People here love the coffee cup cut-outs that recognize their donation,” says Holly. “We stick them up on the wall, and they love to write their names on them. Kids aren’t the only ones who like that stuff!”

This fall, make your coffee count by hosting an Alzheimer Coffee Break! Visit alzheimercoffeebreak.ca

Coffee Break® brings the community together

Coffee Break® brings the community together

Verna Mowat

For the past few years, Verna Mowat has been hosting a Coffee Break® event on her family farm in the Westman region of Manitoba. Despite wind and rain, people in the community venture down the gravel road to Verna’s farm, where a smile and a warm cup of coffee are waiting for each Coffee Break guest.

“Lots of people from the community all come out – from Cypress, Glenboro, even neighbours down the road. I think we had 35 people last year,” says Verna.

Running with the mantra that a Coffee Break event can be as big or as small as you like, Verna goes all out in getting everyone involved. She makes the most out of the Coffee Break event kit (supplied by the Alzheimer Society) by encouraging people to autograph her Coffee Break poster. Many of her guests love this gesture as it gives them an opportunity to write a personal message about who they’re supporting.

Verna’s dedication is born out of her desire to help make a difference in the fight against dementia. Her mother lived with it for 19 years and her sister is currently going through the mid-stage of Alzheimer’s disease. Verna has seen the effects first hand and is concerned about the toll it takes on families.

In addition to raising money through hosting a Coffee Break event, Verna sells home-made pottery pins at craft markets in her community. Contributors like her are integral to ensuring the Alzheimer Society is able to support those affected by dementia. We thank her sincerely for everything she has done.

This fall, make your coffee count by hosting an Alzheimer Coffee Break! Visit alzheimercoffeebreak.ca