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Getting a dementia diagnosis – where do you start?

Getting a dementia diagnosis – where do you start?

It can start with something simple, like having trouble following your favourite recipe, or putting your car keys in the fridge. Maybe you’ve noticed small changes in your memory that are affecting how you do things day-to-day.

If you can’t quite remember things that should be straightforward for you, or if you notice changes in your mood or ability to communicate, make an appointment to see your family doctor right away.

Diagnosing dementia is a complex and difficult process. The first thing your doctor will do is try to rule out if it’s a treatable condition, like depression or even an infection.

By finding out what is causing your symptoms, you can get the right kind of care, support and access to treatments as early as possible.

Be prepared to start the conversation with your doctor:

  • Take the time to review the 10 warning signs of dementia. This is important because dementia is not a normal part of aging, nor is memory loss the only symptom.
  • Jot down the signs you’ve been noticing in yourself. When did these start? Have they changed over time? This information will keep your conversation focused.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions! Ask your doctor if your symptoms could be caused by another health condition.
  • Be sure to let him or her know about your medical history, including any medications you’re currently taking.
  • Ask your doctor to explain what tests you’ll need and how long these will take.
  • Will you need to see a specialist or a series of specialists? How will you need to prepare for these visits?

For more tips on getting ready for your doctor’s visit, download our Getting a diagnosis toolkit. It offers a whole list of questions to ask as well as detailed information about the warning signs and what you can expect during the diagnosis process.

And, if you’re concerned about someone else, we encourage you to pass our toolkit along.


Getting an early diagnosis helps you and your family take control of the situation, plan for future and live as well as possible with dementia. Learn more about the benefits of an early diagnosis

My mother is living with Alzheimer’s disease. Here’s how getting a diagnosis has empowered us

My mother is living with Alzheimer’s disease. Here’s how getting a diagnosis has empowered us

My mother, Bruna was officially diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in January of 2011. The disease was not unknown to her family. Three of her sisters died of complications resulting from this creeping and subtle sickness, as well as her paternal grandmother.

Not long after the second time she had become disoriented while driving and her ever increasing lapses in recall, I decided to take her to visit her doctor. What if she ended up hurting herself, or worse, someone else? I could never forgive myself.

“Well Bruna, I think we’ll have to send you for more tests to figure out why your memory is failing you. Until then I don’t want you driving. It’s too dangerous for you and the people around you,” the doctor explained.

The ride home was awful. “Now I can’t drive anymore. You’d better be prepared to take me wherever I need to go because now I can’t take myself!” The decibel level of her voice rose with every word.

I pulled into her driveway, relieved to be there. My mother exited my van and slammed the door, uttering one last declaration of disappointment at how I had betrayed her. I was drained, yet I could only imagine how she felt – to know that her independence would be taken from her. To think that it would render her less able to look after herself with every passing year. This was the beginning of my mother’s journey with Alzheimer’s.

I cannot stress enough how I agonized about taking her to her doctor, but I knew that the longer we waited, like any serious disease, the less likely we would be able to treat it effectively. In retrospect, we were lucky, because I knew the signs. Even though she presented different symptoms, my aunt had Alzheimer’s years earlier and I saw the horrible process first hand.

The most crucial piece of information I can pass on is that the signs of Alzheimer’s can be different for everyone and that everyone – spouses, sons, daughters, sisters and brothers, need to be informed and aware of the possible risk. Knowing the signs and taking charge of the situation by helping your loved one to visit a health care professional if you suspect issues with memory is the best thing you can do for them.

My mother has been fortunate enough to receive care from many people and organizations in the community – healthcare professionals, community care services and the Alzheimer Society. Our local Alzheimer Society helped us understand the disease and assist my mother in living with it and managing her life. She is still living independently with some assistance and she takes medication which has slowed the progression considerably.

Many have helped to lighten the load. We have spoken to compassionate, supportive and patient individuals from the Alzheimer Society who are willing to give of themselves to assist us and educate us about where we can turn for help. And for this we thank them.

My mother is living independently with Alzheimer’s Disease and she refuses to be its victim. Know the signs and get checked out as soon as possible.

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edy_grazianiEdy Graziani with her mother, Bruna