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Tag: Alzheimer Society Research Program

Let’s talk about research

Let’s talk about research

Today, I’m reaching out because I want to know what you think about dementia research in Canada. Your own experience and the wisdom of your insights can help the Alzheimer Society amplify the voices of people like you – ensuring that these voices are heard and action is taken. I hope you will join the conversation. Since coming on board as CEO, the goodwill, expressions of support and advice from individuals across the country have been heartwarming and deeply appreciated….

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Meet our Researchers: Simon Duchesne, Université Laval

Meet our Researchers: Simon Duchesne, Université Laval

As a biomedical engineer, I don’t have your typical background for someone researching Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. In fact, if you had told me 18 years ago that dementia would be my main field of research, I’d be surprised. Back then, I was most interested in diagnostic radiology—the field of medicine that uses imaging exams to aid in diagnosis—for the planning of epilepsy surgery.

Meet our Researchers: Fernanda de Felice, Queen’s University

Meet our Researchers: Fernanda de Felice, Queen’s University

Who would I be without my memories? I consider the treatment of dementia to be one of the greatest current and future health challenges, and I am keen to find ways to protect the brain from the devastating effects of Alzheimer’s disease. However, there’s a lot we still don’t about this disease. I think a key step is to try to diagnose the disease as early as possible before a lot of damage occurs in the brain, so you’re able…

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Meet our Researchers: Debra Sheets, University of Victoria

Meet our Researchers: Debra Sheets, University of Victoria

For people with dementia and their caregivers, it can be difficult to find activities that strike the right balance between being supportive, being socially appropriate and, of course, being fun. As the disease progresses and abilities change, it’s common for friends to withdraw and activities to start to fall away. A person is left with few things that can offer joy, a sense of purpose and human connection. I’ve seen this firsthand—my father had dementia for 18 years. As it…

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Meet our researchers: Matt Parsons, Memorial University

Meet our researchers: Matt Parsons, Memorial University

Ever since my first undergraduate neuroscience course, I’ve always been fascinated by the ways in which the brain forms and retains memories. Recently, however, I’ve had the misfortune of seeing first-hand the cruel progression of cognitive decline in family members with dementia. So, my desire to research Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is fueled by my personal connection; by my passion for how we learn and make memories; and by my strong belief that by increasing our understanding of how…

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Meet the researchers: Jordan Ali, University of Victoria

Meet the researchers: Jordan Ali, University of Victoria

Jordan Ali is working diligently to give voice to the experiences of those with subjective cognitive decline (SCD). This PhD student from the University of Victoria aims to develop profiles of individuals with this condition, which may signal early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. This can be helpful to general practitioners and front-line support workers in identifying individuals who are at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Video Transcript: Hi, my name is Jordan Ali. My work relates to a phenomenon called…

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AAIC 2017 reveals great strides in research

AAIC 2017 reveals great strides in research

By Nalini Sen, Director, Alzheimer Society Research Program I had the opportunity to attend this year’s annual Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) in London, UK. This conference brings together some of the world’s leading researchers and clinicians in dementia treatment, detection and prevention. And with a record number of presentations—3300 in all—I have to admit, I was awestruck. Here are a few takeaways I would like to share with you: Stress can age your brain How we manage stress is even…

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Research Video Series: Introducing Danielle Alcock

Research Video Series: Introducing Danielle Alcock

Danielle’s personal experience inspired her to pursue research in the field of continuity of care. She will assess existing services through the use of oral narratives by female, Indigenous caregivers for a loved one diagnosed with alcohol-related dementia and will make recommendations based on their experience. Coming from a First Nations family, it was difficult to navigate the healthcare system dealing with jurisdictional barriers, stigma and a lack of resources. As a caregiver, there are no existing supports for alcohol-related…

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Announcing the top 10 Canadian dementia research priorities

Announcing the top 10 Canadian dementia research priorities

[Le texte en français suit l’anglais ci-bas.] By Drs. Katherine McGilton and Jennifer Bethell Over the course of the past year, we asked Canadians affected by dementia—either personally or through their work—for their unanswered questions about living with dementia, dementia prevention, treatment and diagnosis. This study, also known as the Canadian Dementia Priority Setting Partnership, set out to identify the top 10 dementia research priorities, and to share them with Canadian researchers and research funding organizations. We thank the over…

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Research Video Series: Introducing Sharon Koehn

Research Video Series: Introducing Sharon Koehn

Too often, immigrants in Canada don’t receive the help and support they need because of barriers like language and culture. That’s why Dr. Sharon Koehn from Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, is on a mission to identify ways to foster relationships of trust among immigrants affected by dementia and encourage them to reach out to multicultural agencies. Living with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is hard enough; it’s essential that we ensure that we don’t make it even harder by…

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