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Research Video Series: Introducing Sharon Koehn

Research Video Series: Introducing Sharon Koehn

Too often, immigrants in Canada don’t receive the help and support they need because of barriers like language and culture.

That’s why Dr. Sharon Koehn from Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, is on a mission to identify ways to foster relationships of trust among immigrants affected by dementia and encourage them to reach out to multicultural agencies.

Living with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is hard enough; it’s essential that we ensure that we don’t make it even harder by not paying attention to how and if people access appropriate information and care.
-Dr. Sharon Koehn

Dr. Sharon Koehn

Quality of Life Grant Recipient in Alzheimer’s disease and dementia – $119,623
Project: Building trust to facilitate access to dementia care for immigrant older adults: the role of the multicultural services sector.

Read about more of our grant and award recipients here.

Research Video Series: Introducing Dr. Edith Hamel

Research Video Series: Introducing Dr. Edith Hamel


Dr. Edith Hamel’s research focuses on the supply of blood to the brain, which is so important as the brain doesn’t have a reserve of oxygen and glucose – the main fuel for neurons. This project could uncover ways to slow down the progression of vascular dementia, possibly through the use of therapies already available for the treatment of diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. Dr. Hamel is a professor at McGill University in Montreal.

I strongly believe that real possibilities exist to prevent or delay the appearance of Alzheimer’s disease or vascular dementia.
-Dr. Edith Hamel

Dr. Edith Hamel

Biomedical Grant Recipient in Alzheimer’s disease and dementia – $150,000
Project: Role of compromised cerebral circulation in susceptibility to cognitive failure.

Read about more of our grant and award recipients here.

Research Video Series: Introducing Iva Brunec

Research Video Series: Introducing Iva Brunec


Iva Brunec is investigating how memories about the duration and order of events are created in healthy brains, and how this ability changes in those at risk for dementia. Is the ability to encode and recall information about time one of the first functions to break down with Alzheimer’s disease? Does it affect other aspects of memory as a result? This research aims to provide evidence of a sensitive indicator before a diagnosis of dementia even occurs.

Investigating these disorders and aiming to understand what causes them, how they progress, and how they may be alleviated or prevented could enrich the lives of not only those living with dementia but also the networks of their families and caregivers.
-Iva Brunec

Iva Brunec

Biomedical Doctoral Award Recipient in Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia – $66,000
Project: Investigating the hippocampal role in encoding temporal information as a possible

Read about more of our grant and award recipients here.

Research Video Series: Introducing Hadir AlQot

Research Video Series: Introducing Hadir AlQot


Hadir AlQot aims to further our knowledge and understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying Alzheimer’s disease. Specifically, she aims to investigate a novel aspect of the cholinergic system and its vulnerability in Alzheimer’s disease in relation to key pathological features and cognitive decline. Hadir AlQot is doctoral student at the University of Western Ontario.

It is my hope that this research will help unravel potential novel therapeutic targets for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.
-Hadir AlQot

Hadir AlQot

Biomedical Doctoral Award Recipient in Alzheimer’s disease and dementia – $66,000
Project: The functional role of nuclear 82-kDa ChAT in APP metabolism and its potential neuroprotective significance

Read about more of our grant and award recipients here.

Research Video Series: Introducing Dr. Lisa M. Munter

Research Video Series: Introducing Dr. Lisa M. Munter


Dr. Lisa M. Munter will be investigating a novel aspect of the cholesterol metabolism with respect to Alzheimer’s disease. Her goal is to understand how dietary cholesterol affects generation of harmful amyloid peptides. She hopes to reveal whether certain lipoprotein particles of the blood may trigger amyloid generation in the brain. Dr. Munter is a researcher and professor at McGill University and the recipient of an ASRP biomedical grant.

A long and prosperous life should end with human dignity.
-Dr. Lisa M. Munter

Dr. Lisa M. Munter

Biomedical Grant Recipient in Alzheimer’s disease and dementia – $150, 000
Project: Peripheral and central pathways of cholesterol-induced Alzheimer’s disease pathology

Read about more of our grant and award recipients here.

Research Video Series: Introducing Marco Prado

Research Video Series: Introducing Marco Prado


Dr. Marco Prado’s research aims to address the mechanisms by which deficient cholinergic circuits contribute to dementia. He is an Alzheimer Society Research Program Biomedical Research Grant recipient and a professor at the University of Western Ontario.

Let’s make sure that aging does not mean losing one’s identity.
-Dr. Marco Prado

Dr. Marco Prado

Biomedical Grant Recipient in Alzheimer’s disease and dementia – $149,128
Project: Mechanisms of anti-cholinergic activity mediated dementia and Alzheimer’s pathology

Read about more of our grants and awards recipients here.

Research Video Series: Introducing Laura Hamilton

Research Video Series: Introducing Laura Hamilton


Dr. Laura Hamilton is testing the efficacy of a new therapeutic target (stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD)-1) to improve learning and memory deficits in Alzheimer’s disease using a mouse model. Laura is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Montréal and is this year’s Alzheimer Society Research Program Spark Award Recipient.

The potential to contribute to a better quality of life for millions of people motivates me every day.
-Dr. Laura Hamilton

Dr. Laura Hamilton

Spark Postdoctoral Fellowship in Alzheimer’s Disease (Biomedical) – $100,000
Project: Triggers and behavioural consequences of elevated oleic acid in the Alzheimer’s disease brain

Read about more of our grants and awards recipients here.

Research Video Series: Introducing Stephanie Chamberlain

Research Video Series: Introducing Stephanie Chamberlain


Trained as a personal support worker in long-term care, Stephanie Chamberlain is currently pursuing her PhD at the University of Alberta. There, she is assessing the impact of court-appointed public guardianship on the health and care needs of long-term care residents. Stephanie is the Alzheimer Society Research Program’s first Revera Scholar.

It is essential that we improve quality of life and quality of care to those with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia because how we treat a life that has been lived is reflective of our essential humanity.
-Stephanie Chamberlain

Stephanie Chamberlain

Revera Scholar Doctoral Award in Alzheimer’s disease (Quality of Life) – $66,000
Project: Unrepresented older adults: The impact of public guardianship on resident health and care needs in long-term care

Read about more of our grants and awards recipients here.

Research Video Series: Introducing Dr. Rahel Rabi

Research Video Series: Introducing Dr. Rahel Rabi


At the University of Toronto, Rahel Rabi’s research focuses on diagnosis and detection, where she is working hard to identify the cognitive biomarkers of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In this video, Rahel describes her research funded by the Alzheimer Society Research Program in her own words.

Scientists have made remarkable strides in understanding Alzheimer’s disease, and with recent advances in research involving novel techniques, we can work towards finding a cure.
-Rahel Rabi

Rahel Rabi

Rawlinson Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Alzheimer’s Disease (Quality of Life) – $100,000
Project: Stroop event-related potentials as neurocognitive markers for amnestic mild cognitive impairment
This project is funded by the Rawlinson Family.

Read about more of our grants and awards recipients here.

Introducing the 2015 Alzheimer Society Research Program (ASRP) Community Representatives / Des représentants de la collectivité participent au Programme de recherche de la Société Alzheimer (PRSA)

Introducing the 2015 Alzheimer Society Research Program (ASRP) Community Representatives / Des représentants de la collectivité participent au Programme de recherche de la Société Alzheimer (PRSA)

This year the Alzheimer Society celebrates 27 years of funding research through the Alzheimer Society Research Program (ASRP). The peer review panel meetings were held in February 2015 in Toronto, Ontario, and included the role of Community Representatives.

Community Representatives are members of the general public who are not currently involved with research who are given the opportunity to comment on the intent, purpose and on the clarity of the language used within the lay summaries of research applications that are received by the Society. Their involvement in peer review serves as a mechanism for public accountability by providing feedback on the ASRP peer review process.

It is with great pleasure that we introduce our 2015 Community Representatives:

“I was given the chance to understand the peer review process and the Alzheimer society’s involvement in research when I reviewed as a community representative. Being a part of the process meant a lot to me. The different abstracts read were very helpful to me because it gave me hope about my husband who has MCI, some of which may help him someday.  Also, the doctors we met were all very professional and ethical, open and friendly. As a caregiver I found the peer review process to be a learning experience; I got to learn about interesting abstracts and research about MCI/Alzheimer’s disease/Dementia.

Funding research on Alzheimer’s disease and dementia is important to me because there is a need for early diagnosis, understanding the cause of Alzheimer’s and treatment for the different types of dementias. Hopefully my husband and children and others will benefit from this research.”

-Lydia Watts, 2015 Community Representative, Biomedical Peer Review Panel

Lydia is the primary caregiver to her husband, Bruce, who has Mild Cognitive Impairment. She is a retired medical technologist and now enjoys volunteering and her hobbies include beading and taking online courses.

Bruce-and-Lydia-Watts
“This has been a rewarding and interesting experience. It is encouraging to hear how much research and development there is to control the advancement and perhaps eventually cure this devastating disease. Everyone we met at this conference are very friendly, open and encouraging people all working together with a similar goal – to beat this disease and improve our quality of life. Having an opportunity to comment on the research left me feeling heard and understood for the input I was given the chance to offer.

As a person living with dementia I found the peer review process to be an important and worthwhile endeavour and time well spent.

Funding research on Alzheimer’s disease and dementia is important to me because research is finding a way to control and eventually cure Alzheimer’s and MCI is important now and for future generations.”

-Bruce Watts, 2015 Community Representative, Biomedical Peer Review Panel

Bruce is living with Mild Cognitive Impairment and is supported by his wife Lydia and family. He is a retired medical technologist. His hobbies include photography.

 

Gail“This has been a positive and encouraging experience. I am impressed with the variety of proposals and the thorough and detailed process used to make decisions. The discussions were clear and lively and people were patient yet challenging.

As a person living with dementia I found the peer review process to be encouraging and thorough.

Funding research on Alzheimer’s disease and dementia is important to me because I hope they will find a cure. As well it will provide different and new ways to deal with the disease. I am particularly interested in long term care.”

-Gail Reid, 2015 Community Representative, Quality of Life Peer Review Panel

Gail is living with Alzheimer’s disease. She formerly worked as a social worker, magazine editor and writer.

 

Sandi“I am honoured and pleased to play a small part on this panel.As a person living with dementia I found the peer review process to be very formative and interesting.

Funding research on Alzheimer’s disease and dementia is important to me because with the aging population there is a great need.”

-Sandi Matchett, 2015 Community Representative, Quality of Life Peer Review Panel

Sandi is living with dementia. She is a former graphic designer who enjoys water colour painting and playing tennis.

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Le Programme de recherche de la Société Alzheimer finance la recherche depuis maintenant 27 ans. Des représentants de la collectivité ont participé aux réunions des comités d’évaluation par des pairs, qui ont eu lieu en février 2015 à Toronto (Ontario).

Les représentants de la collectivité sont des membres du grand public qui ne participent pas actuellement à la recherche. Ils donnent leurs commentaires sur les intentions et les objectifs des projets de recherche soumis et sur la clarté du langage utilisé dans les résumés simplifiés. Leur contribution au processus d’évaluation par des pairs fournit un mécanisme de reddition de comptes auprès du public.

Nous sommes très heureux de vous présenter nos représentants de la collectivité pour 2015.

« À titre de représentante de la collectivité, j’ai eu la chance de comprendre le fonctionnement du processus d’évaluation par des pairs et les modalités de participation de la Société Alzheimer à la recherche. Cela a été très important pour moi de participer à ce processus. Les divers résumés que j’ai lus m’ont donné beaucoup d’espoir pour mon mari qui est atteint d’un trouble cognitif léger. Certains des projets soumis pourraient un jour ou l’autre lui venir en aide. Tous les médecins que j’ai rencontrés ont fait preuve d’éthique et de professionnalisme, en plus d’être très ouverts et sympathiques. Le processus d’évaluation par des pairs m’a permis d’enrichir mes connaissances à titre d’aidante. J’ai appris beaucoup à la lecture des résumés de recherche sur les troubles cognitifs légers, la maladie d’Alzheimer et les maladies apparentées.

Le financement de la recherche sur l’Alzheimer et les maladies apparentées me tient à cœur. Il est important d’établir rapidement le diagnostic et de trouver les causes de ces maladies afin de mettre au point un traitement. J’espère que mon mari, mes enfants et d’autres personnes pourront en profiter »

– Lydia Watts, représentante de la collectivité, comité d’évaluation par les pairs, volet biomédical

Mme Watts est l’aidante principale de son mari, Bruce, atteint d’un trouble cognitif léger. Technologiste médicale à la retraite, elle aime faire du bénévolat, broder et suivre des cours en ligne.

Bruce-and-Lydia-Watts
“« Cette expérience a été très intéressante et très enrichissante. L’ampleur des recherches menées actuellement pour combattre et guérir cette terrible maladie m’a beaucoup encouragé. Au cours de cette conférence, nous avons rencontré des gens sympathiques, ouverts et encourageants, qui travaillent tous ensemble à la réalisation d’un même objectif , à savoir améliorer notre qualité de vie et vaincre cette maladie. Cette chance que j’ai eue d’émettre mes commentaires sur la recherche m’a donné le sentiment d’être entendu et compris. À titre de personne atteinte d’une maladie cognitive, ma participation au processus d’évaluation par des pairs a été pour moi une activité très gratifiante.

Si nous voulons combattre l’Alzheimer et les maladies apparentées et en arriver un jour à les vaincre, il est important de poursuivre le financement de la recherche pour les personnes atteintes aujourd’hui et pour les générations futures. »

-Bruce Watts, comité d’évaluation par les pairs 2015, volet biomédical

M. Watt, technologiste médical à la retraite, est atteint d’un trouble cognitif léger. Il bénéficie du soutien de sa femme Lydia et de sa famille.

 

Gail« Cette expérience a été positive et encourageante. Je suis impressionnée par la variété des projets soumis et le processus minutieux mis en place pour prendre les décisions. Les discussions étaient animées et intéressantes, exigeantes et stimulantes.

La recherche sur l’Alzheimer et les maladies apparentées est importante pour moi parce qu’elle nous permettra de trouver de nouveaux moyens de combattre ces maladies et de découvrir un remède. Je m’intéresse particulièrement aux soins de longue durée. »

-Gail Reid, représentante du public 2015, comité d’évaluation par des pairs, volet qualité de vie

Mme Reid, qui est atteinte de la maladie d’Alzheimer, a été travailleuse sociale, rédactrice en chef d’une revue et écrivaine.

 

Sandi
« Je suis atteinte d’une maladie cognitive et je suis heureuse du petit rôle que je remplis au sein de ce comité.

Le processus d’évaluation par des pairs a pour moi été très formateur et très intéressant.

Le financement de la recherche sur l’Alzheimer et les maladies apparentées est important en raison des nouveaux besoins créés par le vieillissement de la population. »

-Sandi Matchett, comité d’évaluation par les pairs 2015, volet qualité de vie

Mme Matchett, représentante de la collectivité, est atteinte d’une maladie cognitive. Graphiste à la retraite, elle aime l’aquarelle et le tennis.