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Tag: Alzheimer’s disease

Why I walk in the IG Wealth Management Walk for Alzheimer’s

Why I walk in the IG Wealth Management Walk for Alzheimer’s

The IG Wealth Management Walk for Alzheimer’s is Canada’s biggest fundraiser for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, raising over $5 million in 2018. These funds support local Alzheimer Society programs and services that improve quality of life for people living with dementia and their families. This spring, thousands of Canadians will participate in Walk events taking place in over 300 communities across the country. We asked four of these Canadians to share their thoughts on why they participate in the…

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“Do the right thing.” Challenging stigmas and stereotypes against dementia.

“Do the right thing.” Challenging stigmas and stereotypes against dementia.

Irene Fantopoulos lives in Toronto, Ontario. Besides working for the Ontario Public Service, she also is a caregiver for her mother, Mary. After reading about #ilivewithdementia.ca, Irene was inspired to tell her own story regarding her experiences with stigma against people living with dementia and their caregivers. By Irene Fantopoulos I recently wrote an article for the Ontario Public Service about my mother Mary. Mom has a mixed diagnosis of vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Her condition is compounded by…

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Yes. I live with dementia. Let me help you understand: Lisa Raitt

Yes. I live with dementia. Let me help you understand: Lisa Raitt

Lisa Raitt, Member of Parliament for Milton, and her husband Bruce Wood, diagnosed with dementia at 56, live with dementia, and during Alzheimer’s Awareness Month, they’re sharing their story to help you understand. In 2015, Julianne Moore won the Best Actress Oscar for her portrayal of a woman with young onset Alzheimer’s disease in the movie Still Alice.  I love movies and always have, but I rejected the notion of ever seeing this one. I was ignorant of what Alzheimer’s…

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Yes. I live with dementia. Let me help you understand: Robin Barrett

Yes. I live with dementia. Let me help you understand: Robin Barrett

Robin Barrett lives in Ottawa, Ontario, where she supports her husband, Keith, diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2016. My husband Keith was diagnosed with young onset dementia (YOD)—probable Alzheimer’s in December 2016 at 57 years old. This was following about two and a half years of seeing various specialists. At one point, he had seen about six different neurologists. Keith and I have been together since 2004 and married in June 2016. We eloped together in New Orleans and it…

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Yes. I live with dementia. Let me help you understand: Keith Barrett

Yes. I live with dementia. Let me help you understand: Keith Barrett

Keith Barrett, 59, lives in Ottawa, Ontario with his wife Robin. For over 20 years, Keith has co-owned a business supporting adults and children with developmental and physical disabilities. He continues to work full-time. Keith was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in December 2016. The news was that I had young onset dementia (YOD)—specifically, Alzheimer’s—was difficult news to hear and I couldn’t believe it. I was retested in the spring of 2018 as I did not present as having young onset,…

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Yes. I live with dementia. Let me help you understand: Jane Kennedy

Yes. I live with dementia. Let me help you understand: Jane Kennedy

Jane Kennedy lives in Newmarket, Ontario, where she works as a teacher. She is also a caregiver to her mom, Eileen, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2016. My mom was officially diagnosed at age 84. However, there were signs already of dementia for some time. The diagnosis didn’t come as a complete surprise because my grandmother had it and I was already seeing some early signs with my mom. I would say though that I also experienced some…

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Yes. I live with dementia. Let me help you understand: Ron Robert

Yes. I live with dementia. Let me help you understand: Ron Robert

Ron Robert, 81, lives in London, Ontario. Highly interested in politics, Ron worked as a journalist for two decades covering the British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan provincial legislatures before working the western desk for then-Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. Ron was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2015. My family and I are very familiar with Alzheimer’s—so my diagnosis, while upsetting, was not a complete surprise. I have two siblings who were also diagnosed with the disease. Even though there is a…

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Visiting someone with dementia over the holidays? Here are 10 tips

Visiting someone with dementia over the holidays? Here are 10 tips

Now that the holidays are here, you may be circling some dates in your calendar for visits with friends and family. As the song goes, it’s the most wonderful time of year. Although, after gift buying, party planning and more, it can certainly feel like it’s the most stressful! It can feel even more trying for a person living with dementia. Common features of a holiday gathering—large groups of people, a quick pace and loud, frequent noises—can leave someone with…

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Gift ideas for people with dementia

Gift ideas for people with dementia

The holiday season is upon us, and many of us are on the hunt for the perfect gifts for the special people in our lives. If someone on your list has dementia, it can be challenging to think of gifts that are appropriate given the person’s changing abilities. But no matter the stage of the disease, the right gift exists that can bring them joy and support their quality of life. While you’re making your list and checking it twice,…

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Meet our Researchers: Lillian Hung, Simon Fraser University

Meet our Researchers: Lillian Hung, Simon Fraser University

As Canada’s population ages and more people are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia, hospitals are seeing a growing number of acute care visits by people with dementia. The reason for their stay may not directly relate to their dementia. For example, they may have heart disease, they may have broken bones after a fall or they are feeling depressed. However, a stay in the hospital can be a stressful if not frightening experience for anyone, and…

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