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Tag: Alzheimer’s disease

What’s love got to do with Alzheimer’s? A lot

What’s love got to do with Alzheimer’s? A lot

By Alex Westman

Mr. and Mrs. Alex and Donna Westman

My wife Donna and I met when we were just teenagers—she was 18, I was 16. Despite our youth, we understood early on that we had a deep connection. It was an amazing thing, really, and still is. There was magic in her and she saw something in me. I had a reputation as a bit of a scrapper, but she soon took care of that.

These days, I’m almost respectable. I’m a three-term municipal councillor in the Township of Lucan Biddulph, Ontario, and a 30-year veteran of the fire department. She made me who I am, and all these years later, Donna is still the love of my life.

Why am I telling you this? Because I want you to know that the love we share is the armour we wear when things get tough. And in 2009, things got really tough.

Mr. and Mrs. Alex and Donna Westman

That was the year she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. She was 47. I remember sitting beside her in the chair in the doctor’s office. I looked at her, and she looked at me, and I said, “we’ll get through this together.” And we have.

We’ve had help, of course. Donna’s sister Gale and our daughter Sara-Beth have been nothing short of amazing; their love for Donna shines through in everything they do for her.

My point, as I’m sure you are beginning to see, is that you can’t do this without love. This disease is big. It has teeth, and horns and claws. If we didn’t have love, this disease would destroy us both.

Now I don’t want you to think I live in some fantasy land. We’ve had our ups and downs. We’ve gone to marriage counselling. There were times we didn’t particularly like each other. But we always loved each other and we always knew we wanted to make it work.

Mr. and Mrs. Alex and Donna Westman

I remember vividly the spring following Donna’s diagnosis when we planted forget-me-not flowers in her garden. The garden has always been a special place where she tended to each plant as if it were the only one. The year before, we had planted daffodils for my parents who died of cancer. This spring, we wanted forget-me-nots for Donna.

When we finished, we stood back to admire our work. She put her head on my shoulder and I said, “It’s OK, sweetie. I’ll remember our life together for both of us.”

Mr. and Mrs. Alex and Donna Westman

Racing for memories

Racing for memories

Recently, my family has joined the unfortunate ranks of those who have been impacted by Alzheimer’s disease. My mom started showing early signs of the disease a few years ago, and it has slowly and stubbornly progressed ever since. The toll that Alzheimer’s is taking on my mom is obvious and devastating. Less obvious, but just as significant, is the impact it is having on my dad. As my mom’s primary caregiver, it’s been said that my dad must ride the world’s tallest, fastest and scariest emotional roller coaster each and every day. Sadly, in my observation, this is absolutely true.

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Hope in the face of Alzheimer’s

Hope in the face of Alzheimer’s

One might think that having a disease with no cure wouldn’t leave a person with much hope to draw on. The truth is, if you’d asked me how I felt about the future after I was first diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, my answer would have been far from ‘hopeful.’ Then, one day, that changed.

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Getting a dementia diagnosis – where do you start?

Getting a dementia diagnosis – where do you start?

It can start with something simple, like having trouble following your favourite recipe, or putting your car keys in the fridge. Maybe you’ve noticed small changes in your memory that are affecting how you do things day-to-day.

If you can’t quite remember things that should be straightforward for you, or if you notice changes in your mood or ability to communicate, make an appointment to see your family doctor right away.

Diagnosing dementia is a complex and difficult process. The first thing your doctor will do is try to rule out if it’s a treatable condition, like depression or even an infection.

By finding out what is causing your symptoms, you can get the right kind of care, support and access to treatments as early as possible.

Be prepared to start the conversation with your doctor:

  • Take the time to review the 10 warning signs of dementia. This is important because dementia is not a normal part of aging, nor is memory loss the only symptom.
  • Jot down the signs you’ve been noticing in yourself. When did these start? Have they changed over time? This information will keep your conversation focused.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions! Ask your doctor if your symptoms could be caused by another health condition.
  • Be sure to let him or her know about your medical history, including any medications you’re currently taking.
  • Ask your doctor to explain what tests you’ll need and how long these will take.
  • Will you need to see a specialist or a series of specialists? How will you need to prepare for these visits?

For more tips on getting ready for your doctor’s visit, download our Getting a diagnosis toolkit. It offers a whole list of questions to ask as well as detailed information about the warning signs and what you can expect during the diagnosis process.

And, if you’re concerned about someone else, we encourage you to pass our toolkit along.


Getting an early diagnosis helps you and your family take control of the situation, plan for future and live as well as possible with dementia. Learn more about the benefits of an early diagnosis

Ontario Achieves a Fully-Funded Dementia Strategy in the 2017 Budget!

Ontario Achieves a Fully-Funded Dementia Strategy in the 2017 Budget!

On Thursday, April 27th, 2017, Ontario Finance Minister, Charles Sousa, introduced the 2017 Ontario Budget, A Stronger, Healthier Ontario, which included $100 million over three years for the implementation of an Ontario dementia strategy. This is in addition to the $20 million investment for improving respite care for unpaid care partners that was announced earlier in the week.

This is a major win for the over 220,000 Ontarians and their families who have been impacted by dementia!

The Alzheimer Society of Ontario commends Premier Wynne, Minister Sousa and Minister Hoskins for making dementia a priority in Ontario and investing to enhance care and support for people living with dementia and those who care for them.

The Alzheimer Society strongly believes that a fully-funded and comprehensive strategy is the best solution to ensuring that Ontarians with dementia have the resources they need to live well in their homes and in their communities for as long as possible, and to ensure that their care partners and families are wholly supported.

Ontario Dementia Strategy at Parliament Hill

Thank you to all of our dedicated supporters and allies without whom yesterday’s announcement for a fully-funded provincial dementia strategy may not have been realized.

Stay tuned for more, great dementia strategy news and updates!

Read the Alzheimer Society of Ontario’s press release to respond to the 2017 Budget announcement.

You can be that one to make a difference

You can be that one to make a difference

Did you know that over 210,000 people in Ontario are living with dementia? That over 564,000 Canadians are affected by Alzheimer’s disease or dementia today? We all know, or know of, someone affected by this disease. They are our neighbours, our friends, our grandparents and our uncles. They are someone in our life, and they are more than just a number.

You can be that one to make a difference in the lives of those affected by dementia. By donating today, you can help fund research to find treatments, and even a cure, for this disease. You can help fund programs that support people with dementia and their caregivers, and help improve quality of life.

For people like Amir, your support means the world.

Here is his story:

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Research Video Series: Introducing Hadir AlQot

Research Video Series: Introducing Hadir AlQot


Hadir AlQot aims to further our knowledge and understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying Alzheimer’s disease. Specifically, she aims to investigate a novel aspect of the cholinergic system and its vulnerability in Alzheimer’s disease in relation to key pathological features and cognitive decline. Hadir AlQot is doctoral student at the University of Western Ontario.

It is my hope that this research will help unravel potential novel therapeutic targets for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.
-Hadir AlQot

Hadir AlQot

Biomedical Doctoral Award Recipient in Alzheimer’s disease and dementia – $66,000
Project: The functional role of nuclear 82-kDa ChAT in APP metabolism and its potential neuroprotective significance

Read about more of our grant and award recipients here.

‘We have so much to learn from our grandparents’: A teen’s perspective on Alzheimer’s

‘We have so much to learn from our grandparents’: A teen’s perspective on Alzheimer’s

Marilyn Lemay loved the outdoors and would spend every waking moment there. Inherently creative, she crafted, embroidered, quilted and painted everything in sight. If you stand still for more than a moment, her 17-year-old granddaughter Deborah jokes, Marilyn just might paint you.

Some of that changed eight years ago, when Marilyn was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Deborah’s grandfather Ron moved from their beloved Elliot Lake home to be closer to Deborah’s mother and family. Managing Marilyn’s care himself wasn’t an option. He knew he would need to rely on a close family network.

Marilyn Lemay
Marilyn and Ron Lemay

Deborah loves being closer to her grandmother. She still goes to her with questions about nature and for advice about life. While Marilyn’s memory isn’t what it used to be, she still has a wealth of knowledge to share. And the two of them have joined an inter-generational choir started by the Alzheimer Society London and Middlesex.

“About 15 to 20 high school students get together with seniors living with Alzheimer’s disease and we sing old, war-time songs,” says Deborah. Marilyn loves this choir. It reminds her of her childhood when her mother and aunts would sing and dance in her home.

Deborah loves hanging out with her grandmother, whether they’re walking, having tea parties, or watching episodes of I Love Lucy. There’s so much hope, wisdom, and joy in her grandmother, and Deborah wishes more young people could see that. The chance to connect across generations, to learn from each other and spend valuable time together, is really important.

When Deborah describes her grandparents, her voice lights up: her grandfather is still so in love with her grandmother, even though they met at 13 (63 years ago!). Ron takes Marilyn out on dates, will dance with her whenever music comes on, and the two of them tease each other still. Marilyn is still Marilyn, in other words, and she still lives with deep joy.

Family support systems are an integral part of living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias. And those systems themselves need support with resources, groups, and hope for a cure. Please donate to the Alzheimer Society, so that families like Deborah’s have more time to walk, and sing and laugh. Because it’s not just their disease. It’s ours too. #InItforAlz

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NOUS AVONS TELLEMENT DE CHOSES À APPRENDRE DE NOS GRANDS-PARENTS : PERSPECTIVE D’UNE ADO SUR L’ALZHEIMER

deborah-dravis
Marilyn Lemay adorait la vie en plein air et passait le plus clair de son temps à l’extérieur. D’une nature créative, elle faisait de l’artisanat, de la broderie, des courtepointes et peignait tout ce qu’elle voyait. Si vous restiez juste un moment sans bouger, elle vous prenait comme modèle pour peindre, raconte en riant sa petite-fille Deborah, 17 ans.

Il y a huit ans, la maladie d’Alzheimer a été diagnostiquée à Marilyn et les choses ont changé. Les grands-parents de Deborah ont quitté leur domicile du lac Elliot, qu’ils aimaient tant, pour être plus près de la mère de Deborah et de la famille. Le grand-père ne pouvait prendre soin de Marylin par lui-même et il savait qu’il pouvait compter sur le réseau tissé serré de ses proches.

Deborah adore être à proximité de sa grand-mère. Elle lui pose plein de questions sur la nature et lui demande des conseils de vie. Même si la mémoire de Marilyn n’est plus ce qu’elle était, elle possède toujours de précieuses connaissances à transmettre. Deborah et sa grand-mère font maintenant partie d’une chorale intergénérationnelle mise sur pied par la Société Alzheimer de London et Middlesex.

« Environ 15 à 20 élèves du secondaire se réunissent avec les personnes âgées atteintes de la maladie d’Alzheimer et nous chantons de vieilles chansons du temps de la guerre », poursuit Deborah. Marilyn adore faire partie de ce chœur. Cela lui rappelle son enfance lorsque sa mère et ses tantes chantaient et dansaient à la maison.

Deborah aime beaucoup passer du temps avec sa grand-mère, que ce soit pour faire une promenade, prendre le thé ou regarder des épisodes de « I Love Lucy ». Sa grand-mère est tellement pleine d’espoir, de sagesse et de joie, et Deborah souhaiterait que plus de jeunes puissent profiter de son expérience de vie. La possibilité d’établir des liens entre les générations, d’apprendre les uns des autres et de passer de précieux moments ensemble est vraiment importante.

Lorsque Deborah décrit ses grands-parents, sa voix s’illumine : son grand-père est toujours amoureux de sa grand-mère, même s’ils se sont rencontrés à l’âge de 13 ans (il y a 63 ans de cela!). Il invite Marilyn à sortir, danse avec elle au son de la musique, et les deux adorent toujours se taquiner. En d’autres mots, Marilyn est toujours Marilyn, et elle continue de vivre le cœur rempli de joie.

Le réseau de soutien familial fait partie intégrante de la vie avec la maladie d’Alzheimer ou avec une autre maladie cognitive. Mais il faut appuyer ce réseau avec des ressources, des groupes d’entraide et l’espoir de guérison. Pour aider les familles comme celle de Deborah à disposer de plus de temps pour faire des promenades, chanter et rire, nous vous invitons à faire un don à la Société Alzheimer. Parce que ces maladies ne concernent pas seulement les personnes atteintes, elles nous concernent tous. #TousContreAlz.

‘We’re not running and hiding’: Couple confronts possibility of dementia head-on

‘We’re not running and hiding’: Couple confronts possibility of dementia head-on

When you’ve seen the effects of dementia before, noticing even minor changes in your cognitive abilities can be alarming. Both Yvon and Susanne lost their mothers to Alzheimer’s, so they’re no strangers to the disease.

When Susanne began to show small signs of forgetfulness a few months ago, they immediately went to their doctor. After a series of tests, Susanne was diagnosed with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), which can be—although not always—a precursor to dementia. Susanne was given appropriate medication and is showing signs of improvement. MCI is “just barely on the scale” of neurological impairment, but because of their shared family histories of Alzheimer’s, the couple is not taking any chances.

Yvon has made changes in his life now that he’s supporting a partner with MCI. He’s learning different ways of saying and doing things, taking on new tasks, and researching as much as he can about cognitive impairments and dementias. He’s reading about the importance of nutrition, exercise and mental activities. He’s also grateful for the support of friends and neighbours.

And MCI is not their only health concern. Susanne also lives with lupus and Yvon has diabetes and glaucoma in his right eye. To help manage these multiple health concerns, Yvon and Susanne are looking for new supported living arrangements to relieve some of the stress of handling everything on their own.

They’re hopeful. Being proactive about the disease gives Yvon a sense of clarity and calmness. He encourages Susanne in the kinds of activities that keep her engaged and active – doing household finances and crosswords, knitting and reading. They’re learning everything they can about the disease and have joined a support group, one of many programs available at the Alzheimer Society of Cornwall.

“The more education people have, the better prepared they can be about what’s ahead,” says Yvon. That’s why supporting the Alzheimer Society’s work in raising awareness and funding research is so critical for couples like Yvon and Susanne. Making a donation helps. Because it’s not just their disease. It’s ours too. #InItforAlz

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« On ne peut pas se sauver de la réalité » : Un couple fait face à la possibilité de se voir confronter à la maladie d’Alzheimer

Yvon and Susanne Brazeau

Même des changements mineurs dans nos capacités cognitives peuvent nous inquiéter quand on connaît les conséquences de la maladie d’Alzheimer. Cette maladie a emporté la mère de Suzanne et celle d’Yvon. Tous deux savent très bien de quoi il en retourne.

Il y a quelques mois, Suzanne a commencé à montrer des signes de perte de mémoire. Tout de suite, elle a consulté son médecin. Après une série de tests, un diagnostic de déficit cognitif léger lui a été confirmé. Même si cela n’est pas toujours le cas, ce diagnostic pourrait être un signe avant-coureur de maladie cognitive. Suzanne prend les médicaments recommandés pas son médecin et montre maintenant des signes d’amélioration. Le déficit cognitif léger est un trouble neurologique mineur, mais, en raison de ses antécédents familiaux, Suzanne ne veut courir aucun risque.

Yvon a modifié un peu son style de vie depuis qu’il prête assistance à sa conjointe. Il apprend de nouvelles façons de dire et de faire les choses, prend en charge de nouvelles tâches, et s’informe du mieux qu’il le peut sur les questions entourant les déficiences et maladies cognitives. Ses lectures lui ont fait prendre conscience de l’importance de la nutrition, de l’exercice et des activités mentales. Ses amis et ses voisins le soutiennent et il en est très reconnaissant.

Mais ce n’est pas tout. Suzanne est également atteinte du lupus et Yvon a le diabète, en plus d’un glaucome à l’œil droit. Pour ne plus être livrés à eux-mêmes dans leur combat contre la maladie et pour évacuer un peu de stress, Yvon et Suzanne tentent actuellement de trouver des services d’aide à la vie autonome.

Par-dessus tout, ils gardent l’espoir. Grâce à son attitude proactive face à la maladie, Yvon éprouve un sentiment de clarté et de calme. Il encourage Suzanne à rester active en participant aux finances du ménage et en faisant des mots croisés, du tricot et de la lecture. Ils apprennent tout ce qu’ils peuvent sur la maladie et font maintenant partie d’un groupe de soutien, qui est l’un des nombreux services offerts par la Société Alzheimer de Cornwall.

« Plus on s’informe, mieux on se prépare pour l’avenir », déclare Yvon. C’est pourquoi il est si important de soutenir les initiatives de sensibilisation du public et de financement de la recherche de la Société Alzheimer. Votre contribution est importante parce que les maladies cognitives ne concernent pas seulement les personnes atteintes. Elles nous concernent tous. #TousContreAlzheimer.

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It’s not always Alzheimer’s: One couple’s story of getting the ‘right’ diagnosis

It’s not always Alzheimer’s: One couple’s story of getting the ‘right’ diagnosis

David, a kind, quiet and intelligent man, connected to his family, with lots of friends, and very active in his community, started to become withdrawn and apathetic. His wife Wendy knew something wasn’t quite right.

The Hughes sought help early, but much time passed before they found out that David has Lewy body dementia.

Wendy became an advocate for her life partner. David was initially diagnosed with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. As she did more research, she wondered about the symptoms. David’s memory loss fluctuated, rather than declined. And what Wendy noticed most was not so much memory loss, but that his personality had changed significantly.

After several years of persistence, David was finally diagnosed with Lewy body dementia.

Their story is a reminder that getting a diagnosis can be a long and uncertain process. Know the symptoms of dementia. Get help as soon as possible. And play an active role in seeking out the best health care options for you and your family.

David’s new status came as somewhat of a relief for the couple and Wendy continues to learn as much as she can about Lewy body. Now they have access to the right treatments and support, and she and David can get on with their lives.

“You can’t do this on your own, and I’ve realized it’s perfectly okay to ask for help,” says Wendy. She has reached out to her local Alzheimer Society (Hamilton Halton) and made a point to seek out new friends. Socializing gives her a much-needed break and allows her to better care for David.

Each year 25,000 Canadians are diagnosed with dementia. Wendy believes everyone needs to learn more about Alzheimer’s and other dementias-“awareness can only lead to better understanding and acceptance of this disease.”

This January, you too can make a difference. It’s not just their disease. It’s ours too. #InItForAlz

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Il NE S’AGIT PAS TOUJOURS DE L’ALZHEIMER : L’HISTOIRE D’UN COUPLE EN QUÊTE DU « BON » DIAGNOSTIC

Wendy & David Hughes
David est un homme sympathique, calme et intelligent. Il a toujours été attaché à sa famille et fidèle à ses amis. Lui qui était si actif socialement, il a commencé à devenir renfermé et apathique. Sa femme, Wendy, a su que quelque chose n’allait pas.

Les Hughes ont rapidement été cherchés de l’aide, mais beaucoup de temps s’est écoulé avant de découvrir que David était atteint de la maladie à corps de Lewy.

Wendy a pris fait et cause pour son compagnon de vie. David a tout d’abord reçu un diagnostic de Parkinson et de maladie d’Alzheimer. Au fil de ses recherches, Wendy a commencé à douter. La mémoire de David subissait des fluctuations plutôt qu’un déclin. Mais, par-dessus tout, ce n’était pas tant sa mémoire qui était en cause, mais sa personnalité qui avait énormément changé.

Après plusieurs années d’attente, la maladie à corps de Lewy a finalement été diagnostiquée à David.

Leur histoire nous rappelle que le diagnostic est parfois établi à la suite d’un processus long et incertain. Informez-vous sur les symptômes des maladies cognitives. Obtenez de l’aide aussitôt que possible. Et jouez un rôle actif dans la recherche des meilleures options de soins de santé pour vous et votre famille.

Le couple a accueilli avec un certain soulagement le nouveau statut de David. Pour sa part, Wendy continue de se renseigner le plus possible sur la maladie à corps de Lewy. Ils ont maintenant accès à des traitements adéquats et à du soutien, et ils peuvent poursuivre leur vie.

« Vous ne pouvez pas tout faire par vous-même et j’ai réalisé qu’il est parfaitement acceptable de demander de l’aide », déclare Wendy. Elle a communiqué avec sa Société Alzheimer locale (Hamilton Halton) et s’est promis de se faire de nouveaux amis. Le fait de socialiser lui donne le répit dont elle a tant besoin et lui permet de mieux prendre soin de David.

Chaque année 25 000 Canadiens reçoivent un diagnostic de maladie cognitive. Wendy croit que tout le monde devrait s’informer sur la maladie d’Alzheimer et les maladies apparentées. « Être bien renseigné nous aide à mieux comprendre et à accepter ces maladies. »

En janvier, vous pouvez vous aussi apporter votre contribution. Parce que ces maladies ne concernent pas seulement les personnes atteintes, elles nous concernent tous. #TousContreAlz.