Browsed by
Tag: caregiving

People like Margaret are more than just a number.

People like Margaret are more than just a number.

Did you know that of the 564,000 Canadians with dementia, 60% will go missing or become lost at some point? These men and women are more than just a number.

And so are you. You have the power to be the one who makes an impact.

By making a donation today, you can help fund dementia research initiatives and support vital programs for people with dementia and their families. With your support, we can help people like Margaret and her son David.

Here is Margaret’s story:

Donate Now

Research Video Series: Introducing Danielle Alcock

Research Video Series: Introducing Danielle Alcock


Danielle’s personal experience inspired her to pursue research in the field of continuity of care. She will assess existing services through the use of oral narratives by female, Indigenous caregivers for a loved one diagnosed with alcohol-related dementia and will make recommendations based on their experience.

Coming from a First Nations family, it was difficult to navigate the healthcare system dealing with jurisdictional barriers, stigma and a lack of resources. As a caregiver, there are no existing supports for alcohol-related dementia that are culturally safe.
-Danielle Alcock

Danielle Alcock

Alzheimer Society Research Program Quality of Life Grant Recipient in Alzheimer’s disease and dementia – $66,000
Project: Oral narratives of female Indigenous caregivers for loved ones diagnosed with alcohol-related dementia.

Read about more of our grant and award recipients here.

What’s love got to do with Alzheimer’s? A lot

What’s love got to do with Alzheimer’s? A lot

By Alex Westman

Mr. and Mrs. Alex and Donna Westman

My wife Donna and I met when we were just teenagers—she was 18, I was 16. Despite our youth, we understood early on that we had a deep connection. It was an amazing thing, really, and still is. There was magic in her and she saw something in me. I had a reputation as a bit of a scrapper, but she soon took care of that.

These days, I’m almost respectable. I’m a three-term municipal councillor in the Township of Lucan Biddulph, Ontario, and a 30-year veteran of the fire department. She made me who I am, and all these years later, Donna is still the love of my life.

Why am I telling you this? Because I want you to know that the love we share is the armour we wear when things get tough. And in 2009, things got really tough.

Mr. and Mrs. Alex and Donna Westman

That was the year she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. She was 47. I remember sitting beside her in the chair in the doctor’s office. I looked at her, and she looked at me, and I said, “we’ll get through this together.” And we have.

We’ve had help, of course. Donna’s sister Gale and our daughter Sara-Beth have been nothing short of amazing; their love for Donna shines through in everything they do for her.

My point, as I’m sure you are beginning to see, is that you can’t do this without love. This disease is big. It has teeth, and horns and claws. If we didn’t have love, this disease would destroy us both.

Now I don’t want you to think I live in some fantasy land. We’ve had our ups and downs. We’ve gone to marriage counselling. There were times we didn’t particularly like each other. But we always loved each other and we always knew we wanted to make it work.

Mr. and Mrs. Alex and Donna Westman

I remember vividly the spring following Donna’s diagnosis when we planted forget-me-not flowers in her garden. The garden has always been a special place where she tended to each plant as if it were the only one. The year before, we had planted daffodils for my parents who died of cancer. This spring, we wanted forget-me-nots for Donna.

When we finished, we stood back to admire our work. She put her head on my shoulder and I said, “It’s OK, sweetie. I’ll remember our life together for both of us.”

Mr. and Mrs. Alex and Donna Westman

Canada to become 30th country with national dementia strategy

Canada to become 30th country with national dementia strategy

The Alzheimer Society of Canada celebrates the passage of Bill C-233, An Act respecting a national strategy for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Canada will now become the latest country to develop a national dementia strategy to address the overwhelming scale, impact and cost of dementia.

“For the more than half a million Canadians living with dementia and their families, this is an important milestone,” says Pauline Tardif, CEO of the Alzheimer Society of Canada. “A national strategy enables a coordinated approach to tackling dementia in Canada that will impact the lives of those affected in tangible ways.”

Bill C-233’s co-sponsors, the Honourable Rob Nicholson, MP Niagara Falls, and Rob Oliphant, MP Don Valley West, are to be commended for their leadership and support, as is the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science, and Technology. They have been dedicated champions of the Bill on behalf of Canadians living with dementia, their families, and caregivers.

The Alzheimer Society has long called for a national dementia strategy to enhance research efforts and ensure access to quality care and support so that Canadians with dementia can have the best quality of life. Now that Canada has committed to such a strategy, work begins on implementation.

The Society and its federation partners look forward to continuing to work collaboratively with government, stakeholders and, above all, people living with dementia, to create and implement Canada’s first national dementia strategy.

To learn more, visit www.alzheimer.ca/advocacy.


LE CANADA VA DEVENIR LE TRENTIÈME PAYS DOTÉ D’UNE STRATÉGIE NATIONALE SUR LES MALADIES COGNITIVES

Parliament of Canada

La Société Alzheimer du Canada salue l’adoption du Projet de loi C-233, la Loi concernant une stratégie nationale sur la maladie d’Alzheimer et d’autres démences. Le Canada va maintenant devenir le dernier pays à mettre sur pied une stratégie nationale sur les maladies cognitives pour répondre à l’ampleur, l’impact et au coût de ces maladies.

« Pour les plus de cinq cent mille Canadiens atteints de la maladie d’Alzheimer ou d’une maladie apparentée et leurs familles, il s’agit là d’un jalon important, a déclaré Pauline Tardif, chef de la direction de la Société Alzheimer du Canada. Une stratégie nationale nous permet d’avoir une approche coordonnée pour aborder les maladies cognitives au Canada, ce qui aura des impacts concrets sur la vie des personnes touchées. »

Il convient de féliciter les co-parrains du Projet de loi C-233, l’honorable Rob Nicholson, député de Niagara Falls, et Rob Oliphant, député de Don Valley West, pour leur leadership et leur soutien, tout comme les membres du Comité sénatorial permanent des affaires sociales, des sciences et de la technologie. Ils ont été des champions dévoués au projet de loi au nom des Canadiens touchés par la maladie, des familles et des aidants.

La Société Alzheimer réclame depuis longtemps une stratégie nationale sur les maladies cognitives afin de renforcer les efforts de recherche et assurer l’accès à des aides et des soins de qualité pour que les Canadiens touchés par la maladie puissent jouir d’une qualité de vie optimale. Maintenant que le Canada s’est engagé dans la voie d’une telle stratégie, le travail commence pour la mettre en place.

La Société et les partenaires de la Fédération se réjouissent à l’idée de continuer à collaborer avec le gouvernement, les intervenants, et, par-dessus tout, les personnes touchées par la maladie d’Alzheimer et les maladies apparentées afin de mettre au point et d’instaurer la première stratégie nationale qui y est consacrée au Canada.

Pour en apprendre davantage, rendez-vous à www.alzheimer.ca/defensedesinterets.

Racing for memories

Racing for memories

Recently, my family has joined the unfortunate ranks of those who have been impacted by Alzheimer’s disease. My mom started showing early signs of the disease a few years ago, and it has slowly and stubbornly progressed ever since. The toll that Alzheimer’s is taking on my mom is obvious and devastating. Less obvious, but just as significant, is the impact it is having on my dad. As my mom’s primary caregiver, it’s been said that my dad must ride the world’s tallest, fastest and scariest emotional roller coaster each and every day. Sadly, in my observation, this is absolutely true.

Read More Read More

Ontario Achieves a Fully-Funded Dementia Strategy in the 2017 Budget!

Ontario Achieves a Fully-Funded Dementia Strategy in the 2017 Budget!

On Thursday, April 27th, 2017, Ontario Finance Minister, Charles Sousa, introduced the 2017 Ontario Budget, A Stronger, Healthier Ontario, which included $100 million over three years for the implementation of an Ontario dementia strategy. This is in addition to the $20 million investment for improving respite care for unpaid care partners that was announced earlier in the week.

This is a major win for the over 220,000 Ontarians and their families who have been impacted by dementia!

The Alzheimer Society of Ontario commends Premier Wynne, Minister Sousa and Minister Hoskins for making dementia a priority in Ontario and investing to enhance care and support for people living with dementia and those who care for them.

The Alzheimer Society strongly believes that a fully-funded and comprehensive strategy is the best solution to ensuring that Ontarians with dementia have the resources they need to live well in their homes and in their communities for as long as possible, and to ensure that their care partners and families are wholly supported.

Ontario Dementia Strategy at Parliament Hill

Thank you to all of our dedicated supporters and allies without whom yesterday’s announcement for a fully-funded provincial dementia strategy may not have been realized.

Stay tuned for more, great dementia strategy news and updates!

Read the Alzheimer Society of Ontario’s press release to respond to the 2017 Budget announcement.

Dementia under 65: Where do they fit in?

Dementia under 65: Where do they fit in?

It was love at first sight when Sandy met Doug. They had both ended long marriages. They shared a passion for work, a love of travel, and had compatible plans for retirement. They clicked instantly.

The McLean’s married two years later and were in the midst of living the lives they’d dreamed of when Doug, a top executive, lost his job because of increased anxiety and diminishing cognitive abilities.

Things didn’t get better. Doug became depressed and delusional. He could no longer tell time or do math, and he struggled with his memory.

sandy-mclean2So they began looking for answers. Over the next three years, Doug and Sandy went to doctor after doctor without a definitive diagnosis. It wasn’t until a second neurological test that Doug was diagnosed with Lewy body dementia and immediately put on the right medications. Finally, his symptoms were manageable and the McLean’s were able to fulfill some of their travel dreams.

At 60, Doug is fit and physically active, and is keen to continue life to the fullest. Being active is good for him, but it’s a challenge for Sandy. Doug needs safe, non-judgmental environments, and many activity programs for people with dementia are for seniors 65 and older. Doug doesn’t feel like he fits in.

Sandy is his 24/7 caregiver and advocate. She makes sure Doug keeps busy and plans all of his activities. But that doesn’t leave much time for herself. And, that dream of moving into a house they built outside of their city has been gently let go.

The Alzheimer Society of Manitoba has been a lifeline for Sandy and Doug, offering activities, resources and support services. But we can do so much more.

Donate today so that we can better support caregivers like Sandy and fund vital research to eliminate this disease and its impact on Canadians like Doug. Because it’s not just their disease. It’s ours too. #InItforAlz

DONATE

 

‘We’re not running and hiding’: Couple confronts possibility of dementia head-on

‘We’re not running and hiding’: Couple confronts possibility of dementia head-on

When you’ve seen the effects of dementia before, noticing even minor changes in your cognitive abilities can be alarming. Both Yvon and Susanne lost their mothers to Alzheimer’s, so they’re no strangers to the disease.

When Susanne began to show small signs of forgetfulness a few months ago, they immediately went to their doctor. After a series of tests, Susanne was diagnosed with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), which can be—although not always—a precursor to dementia. Susanne was given appropriate medication and is showing signs of improvement. MCI is “just barely on the scale” of neurological impairment, but because of their shared family histories of Alzheimer’s, the couple is not taking any chances.

Yvon has made changes in his life now that he’s supporting a partner with MCI. He’s learning different ways of saying and doing things, taking on new tasks, and researching as much as he can about cognitive impairments and dementias. He’s reading about the importance of nutrition, exercise and mental activities. He’s also grateful for the support of friends and neighbours.

And MCI is not their only health concern. Susanne also lives with lupus and Yvon has diabetes and glaucoma in his right eye. To help manage these multiple health concerns, Yvon and Susanne are looking for new supported living arrangements to relieve some of the stress of handling everything on their own.

They’re hopeful. Being proactive about the disease gives Yvon a sense of clarity and calmness. He encourages Susanne in the kinds of activities that keep her engaged and active – doing household finances and crosswords, knitting and reading. They’re learning everything they can about the disease and have joined a support group, one of many programs available at the Alzheimer Society of Cornwall.

“The more education people have, the better prepared they can be about what’s ahead,” says Yvon. That’s why supporting the Alzheimer Society’s work in raising awareness and funding research is so critical for couples like Yvon and Susanne. Making a donation helps. Because it’s not just their disease. It’s ours too. #InItforAlz

DONATE


« On ne peut pas se sauver de la réalité » : Un couple fait face à la possibilité de se voir confronter à la maladie d’Alzheimer

Yvon and Susanne Brazeau

Même des changements mineurs dans nos capacités cognitives peuvent nous inquiéter quand on connaît les conséquences de la maladie d’Alzheimer. Cette maladie a emporté la mère de Suzanne et celle d’Yvon. Tous deux savent très bien de quoi il en retourne.

Il y a quelques mois, Suzanne a commencé à montrer des signes de perte de mémoire. Tout de suite, elle a consulté son médecin. Après une série de tests, un diagnostic de déficit cognitif léger lui a été confirmé. Même si cela n’est pas toujours le cas, ce diagnostic pourrait être un signe avant-coureur de maladie cognitive. Suzanne prend les médicaments recommandés pas son médecin et montre maintenant des signes d’amélioration. Le déficit cognitif léger est un trouble neurologique mineur, mais, en raison de ses antécédents familiaux, Suzanne ne veut courir aucun risque.

Yvon a modifié un peu son style de vie depuis qu’il prête assistance à sa conjointe. Il apprend de nouvelles façons de dire et de faire les choses, prend en charge de nouvelles tâches, et s’informe du mieux qu’il le peut sur les questions entourant les déficiences et maladies cognitives. Ses lectures lui ont fait prendre conscience de l’importance de la nutrition, de l’exercice et des activités mentales. Ses amis et ses voisins le soutiennent et il en est très reconnaissant.

Mais ce n’est pas tout. Suzanne est également atteinte du lupus et Yvon a le diabète, en plus d’un glaucome à l’œil droit. Pour ne plus être livrés à eux-mêmes dans leur combat contre la maladie et pour évacuer un peu de stress, Yvon et Suzanne tentent actuellement de trouver des services d’aide à la vie autonome.

Par-dessus tout, ils gardent l’espoir. Grâce à son attitude proactive face à la maladie, Yvon éprouve un sentiment de clarté et de calme. Il encourage Suzanne à rester active en participant aux finances du ménage et en faisant des mots croisés, du tricot et de la lecture. Ils apprennent tout ce qu’ils peuvent sur la maladie et font maintenant partie d’un groupe de soutien, qui est l’un des nombreux services offerts par la Société Alzheimer de Cornwall.

« Plus on s’informe, mieux on se prépare pour l’avenir », déclare Yvon. C’est pourquoi il est si important de soutenir les initiatives de sensibilisation du public et de financement de la recherche de la Société Alzheimer. Votre contribution est importante parce que les maladies cognitives ne concernent pas seulement les personnes atteintes. Elles nous concernent tous. #TousContreAlzheimer.

FAITES UN DON

At 21, Alzheimer’s is the last thing on your mind – until your mom gets it

At 21, Alzheimer’s is the last thing on your mind – until your mom gets it

It’s common to think that dementia affects only particular demographics—like seniors—but Kathryn Fudurich’s story reminds us of how this disease can have a huge impact on anyone’s life.

When Kathryn was 21 and in her last year of university, her mom, Patricia, was diagnosed with young onset dementia. The signs had been there for a while. Patricia had become anxious about everyday tasks like driving, began buying household items in multiples and struggled professionally. At age 55, she could no longer keep her job or live alone. So Kathryn and other family members stepped in.

Kathryn moved back home after graduation and put her life on hold to be a part of her mother’s care. She felt very much alone in this situation at such a young age, so she reached out to the Alzheimer Society of Toronto. Later she discovered some of her own friends were also going through this experience. What Kathryn really needed was to talk to someone who had been there, who knew what it means to live with an irreversible diagnosis.

Kathryn continues to share the responsibility of care with her dad and siblings. But it doesn’t get easier. Caring for someone with dementia is incredibly time-consuming and emotional, because it’s a “living disease,” not something you just “get over.” Kathryn describes feeling the loss of her mom every day, and struggles with the need to be there—or close by—even eight years later.

Through mutual friends, Kathryn met Carolyn Poirier, whose mother also has Alzheimer’s. She joined Carolyn and her friends in founding Memory Ball as a way of raising funds for people living with dementia. “Stepping out of the caregiving role, even briefly, is really important for caregivers,” says Kathryn.

But what’s even more important? When friends step into your world. If you know someone living with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, spend an afternoon or evening with them. Bring them a hot meal, and see first-hand what their life is like.

There are so many ways to support families like Kathryn’s, so many ways to get involved with the people in your community affected by this disease. You can also donate to the Alzheimer Society, so that we can continue to offer resources and fund research. Because it’s not just their disease. It’s ours too. #InItforAlz

DONATE


À 21 ANS, LA MALADIE D’ALZHEIMER EST LE DERNIER DE VOS SOUCIS, JUSQU’À CE QUE VOTRE MÈRE EN SOIT ATTEINTE

kathryn fudurich
On pense souvent que la maladie d’Alzheimer affecte seulement une certaine tranche de la population, à savoir les personnes âgées. Mais l’histoire de Kathryn Fudurich nous rappelle que cette maladie peut avoir de graves répercussions sur la vie de tous.

À l’âge de 21 ans, alors que Kathryn terminait sa dernière année à l’université, la maladie d’Alzheimer à début précoce a été diagnostiquée à sa mère, Patricia. Certains signes s’étaient déjà manifestés depuis quelque temps. Les tâches de la vie quotidienne, comme la conduite automobile, rendaient Patricia très nerveuse. Elle achetait les mêmes produits ménagers à répétition et éprouvait des difficultés dans sa vie professionnelle. À l’âge de 55 ans, elle n’a plus été en mesure de travailler ou de vivre seule. Kathryn et les autres membres de sa famille sont donc intervenus.

Après avoir obtenu son diplôme, Kathryn est rentrée au bercail et a mis sa vie de côté pour prendre soin de sa mère. Elle se sentait très seule dans cette situation à un si jeune âge, et elle a donc communiqué avec la Société Alzheimer de Toronto. Un peu plus tard, elle a découvert que certaines de ses propres amies vivaient la même situation. Ce dont Kathryn avait vraiment besoin, c’était de parler à quelqu’un qui avait vécu la même expérience et qui savait ce que cela voulait dire de vivre avec une maladie irréversible.

Kathryn continue aujourd’hui de partager la responsabilité des soins de sa mère avec son père et ses frères et sœurs. Mais la situation n’est pas facile. Prendre soin d’une personne atteinte d’une maladie cognitive demande beaucoup de temps et d’énergie psychique parce qu’il s’agit d’une maladie évolutive qu’on ne surmonte pas. Kathryn ressent tous les jours ce sentiment de vide devant la maladie de sa mère et essaie d’être là pour elle à ses côtés, ou le plus près possible, même huit ans plus tard.

Par l’entremise d’amis communs, Kathryn a rencontré Carolyn Poirier, dont la mère est également atteinte de l’Alzheimer. En compagnie de Carolyn et de ses amis, elle a participé à la fondation de « Memory Ball » afin de recueillir des fonds pour les personnes atteintes d’une maladie cognitive. « Le fait de sortir de son rôle d’aidant, même brièvement, est vraiment important », déclare Kathryn.

Mais ce qu’il y a de plus important encore, c’est lorsque des amis vous rendent visite. Si vous connaissez une personne atteinte de la maladie d’Alzheimer ou d’une autre maladie cognitive, allez passer un après-midi ou une soirée avec elle. Apportez-lui un repas chaud, et constatez sur place ce à quoi sa vie ressemble.

Il existe de nombreux moyens de soutenir les familles comme celle de Kathryn, et de prendre une part active à la vie des personnes touchées. Vous pouvez également faire un don à la Société Alzheimer pour lui permettre de continuer à offrir des services de soutien et du financement pour la recherche. Parce que ces maladies ne concernent pas seulement les personnes atteintes, elles nous concernent tous. #TousContreAlz.