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AAIC 2017 reveals great strides in research

AAIC 2017 reveals great strides in research

By Nalini Sen, Director, Alzheimer Society Research Program

I had the opportunity to attend this year’s annual Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) in London, UK. This conference brings together some of the world’s leading researchers and clinicians in dementia treatment, detection and prevention. And with a record number of presentations—3300 in all—I have to admit, I was awestruck. Here are a few takeaways I would like to share with you:

Stress can age your brain

How we manage stress is even more important than was previously thought. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin studied 1320 people who had experienced stressful events like losing a job, getting a divorce or grieving the death of a family member. What did they find? A single stressful experience can age your brain by four years! Their findings reaffirm that healthy lifestyle habits matter.

Your brain needs a good night rest

Getting good sleep is as important as getting enough sleep. In a 516-person study, researchers from Wheaton College found greater instances of beta amyloid deposits in the brains of those with sleep disordered breathing and noticed that these deposits accumulated faster over time. Sleep disordered breathing is common. It includes hypopnea (under breathing) and apnea (not breathing) during sleep. While researchers need to do more investigative work, if we can better treat these sleep disorders, we may be able to reduce the risk of dementia or possibly delay the progression of the disease where it has already occurred.

Other presentations at AAIC reported on advancements in diagnosing dementia, which is a complicated and often a long process:

PET brain scans can improve diagnosis

For example, researchers from Sweden reported a 68 per cent increase in dementia diagnoses when PET brain scans were used in a small test sample of 135 people with memory problems. PET scans help identify whether amyloid plaques, the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease, are present in the brain. It does this by injecting a special dye with radioactive tracers into the arm which is then and absorbed by the organs and tissues.

Steps closer to a dementia blood test

In another study, Washington University researchers were able to measure amyloid beta in the cerebrospinal fluid (a fluid in the brain) with 89 per cent accuracy. Amyloid beta and tau protein which accumulate in the brain are triggers for Alzheimer’s disease. While more study is needed, a blood test for dementia may soon become available. This kind of test could identify those at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease even years before symptoms appear.

One thing was clear at this year’s AAIC conference: Researchers around the world are working diligently to find a cure and identify new ways of diagnosing dementia earlier. And while they continue their search, there is now even more evidence that we can take steps to reduce our risk of developing dementia by living a healthier lifestyle.

Learn more about what you can do to keep your brain healthy at alzheimer.ca/brainhealth.

Announcing the top 10 Canadian dementia research priorities

Announcing the top 10 Canadian dementia research priorities

[Le texte en français suit l’anglais ci-bas.]

By Drs. Katherine McGilton and Jennifer Bethell

Over the course of the past year, we asked Canadians affected by dementia—either personally or through their work—for their unanswered questions about living with dementia, dementia prevention, treatment and diagnosis. This study, also known as the Canadian Dementia Priority Setting Partnership, set out to identify the top 10 dementia research priorities, and to share them with Canadian researchers and research funding organizations.

We thank the over 1200 participants who shared their insights. Thousands of questions were submitted and the shortlist was debated at an in-person workshop, held in Toronto on June 8-9, 2017.

Canadian Dementia Priority Setting Partnership workshop,
June 8-9, 2017, in Toronto

The workshop brought together 28 participants from across Canada—persons with dementia, family members, health and social care providers and members of organizations that represent persons with dementia. Participants worked in small teams and as a group to discuss each question and decide what matters most to them.

Here are the top 10 dementia research priorities, according to Canadians affected by dementia:

Top 10 dementia research priorities

The Alzheimer Society Research Program will use these results to help bring the voices of Canadians affected by dementia into the research agenda. These priorities will also be shared with researchers and other research-funding organizations in hopes of stimulating more research in these areas.

The Canadian Dementia Priority Setting Partnership was funded by the Alzheimer Society Research Program as part of the Alzheimer Society’s commitment to the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA). Special thanks to our Steering Group and partner organizations for their involvement and assistance in the study.


ANNONCE DES DIX PRIORITÉS DE RECHERCHE SUR LES MALADIES COGNITIVES AU CANADA

researcher
Par les Dres Katherine McGilton et Jennifer Bethell

Au cours de la dernière année, nous avons demandé aux Canadiens touchés par une maladie cognitive, soit personnellement ou dans le cadre de leur travail, de faire part de leurs questions sans réponses sur la vie avec une maladie cognitive, la prévention, le traitement et le diagnostic. Cette étude, aussi connu sous le nom du Partenariat canadien pour l’établissement des priorités sur les maladies cognitives, visait à identifier les priorités de recherche à l’intention des chercheurs et des organismes de financement.

Nous remercions les plus de 1 200 participants qui ont partagé leurs points de vue. Des milliers de questions ont été soumises et la liste présélectionnée a été débattu lors d’un atelier en personne qui a eu lieu à Toronto les 8 et 9 juin 2017.

Atelier du Partenariat canadien pour l’établissement des priorités sur les maladies cognitives, le 8 et 9 jun 2017 à Toronto

L’atelier a mis à contribution 28 participants de tout le Canada, dont des personnes atteintes d’une maladie cognitive, des aidants familiaux, des fournisseurs de soins de santé et de services sociaux, et des membres d’organisations qui représentent des personnes atteintes d’une maladie cognitive. Les participants ont discuté au sein de petites équipes et en commun de chacune des questions afin de décider ce qui est important pour eux.

Voici les 10 priorités de recherche les plus importantes selon les Canadiens touchés par une maladie cognitive :

Priorités de recherche sur les maladies cognitives

Le Programme de recherche de la Société Alzheimer utilisera ces résultats pour faire entendre la voix des Canadiens touchés par les maladies cognitives dans les futures décisions en ce qui a trait à la recherche. Ces priorités seront également transmises aux chercheurs et aux autres organismes de financement dans l’espoir de stimuler la recherche dans ces domaines de prédilection.

Le Partenariat canadien pour l’établissement des priorités sur les maladies cognitives a été financé par le Programme de recherche de la Société Alzheimer dans le cadre de son engagement envers le Consortium canadien en neurodégénérescence associée au vieillissement (CCNV). Nous remercions tout particulièrement notre groupe d’orientation et les organisations partenaires pour leur participation et contribution à cette etude.

Research Video Series: Introducing Marco Prado

Research Video Series: Introducing Marco Prado


Dr. Marco Prado’s research aims to address the mechanisms by which deficient cholinergic circuits contribute to dementia. He is an Alzheimer Society Research Program Biomedical Research Grant recipient and a professor at the University of Western Ontario.

Let’s make sure that aging does not mean losing one’s identity.
-Dr. Marco Prado

Dr. Marco Prado

Biomedical Grant Recipient in Alzheimer’s disease and dementia – $149,128
Project: Mechanisms of anti-cholinergic activity mediated dementia and Alzheimer’s pathology

Read about more of our grants and awards recipients here.