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Power of Attorney: Empowering you to help your loved one

Power of Attorney: Empowering you to help your loved one

Follow us, as Elizabeth Murray tells the moving story of her mother’s battle with dementia. In this blog series, Murray explores every part of the experience of caring for someone with dementia, sharing her memories and insights from it all. Her words serve as a great reminder of the many ways dementia affects our lives, and the lives of our loved ones.

Moving my mother into a nursing home was a difficult decision. Executing that decision was even more difficult.

My mother had always been fiercely independent. Even after my father died and she lived alone, she was determined to do everything for herself.

My mother knew that if she were to become mentally incapable, someone else would have to make decisions about her health care, medical treatment and living arrangements. We had discussed the benefits of a Power of Attorney for Personal Care and she acknowledged that I was the person she would want to have make those decisions if she couldn’t do so herself. The problem was that she really believed she would always be able to determine her own destiny; that she would always be able to live alone and take care of herself.

Although my husband and I were both lawyers and we knew the consequences of our inaction, neither of us were inclined to push the issue and persuade her to sign the document.

When my mother was diagnosed with dementia, she wasn’t prepared to admit that she needed assistance of any kind and she certainly wasn’t prepared to move out of her house voluntarily.

When my mother was no longer safe living on her own, I didn’t have the authority to move her into a nursing home or to ensure that she received appropriate care. Before I could make any decisions on my mother’s behalf, I had to apply to court and ask to be appointed as her committee. The process was cumbersome and time-consuming. It added to the stress of an already stressful situation.

Contemplating a time when a Power of Attorney for Personal Health Care is required is not easy, but the decision is an important one to make. Don’t make the same mistake I did. It’s better to have a plan and not need it than to need a plan and not have it.

What is a Power of Attorney?

A Power of Attorney is a legal document that gives someone else the power to act on your behalf. This person is called your “attorney,” though he or she is not usually a lawyer. Powers of Attorney for Personal Care deal with the following matters:

• The appointment of an attorney and the appointment of an alternate attorney if the first named attorney is unable or unwilling to make a decision or is not readily available to make a decision;
• The types of decisions an attorney is authorized to make regarding your care;
• Medical directives with respect to treatment;
• Provisions for payment of compensation to the attorney for the decision-making; and
• Provisions to protect the attorney from decisions that might be unpopular with some members of a family.

Depending on where in Canada you live, a Power of Attorney for Personal Care may be called a power of attorney, a personal or health directive, or a representation agreement. Sometimes, the same document can deal with personal care issues as well as financial matters. A committee may also be called a guardian.

At the Alzheimer Society of Ontario, you can find many resources to help you prepare for the future at www.alzsuperhero.ca

 

Written by:

Writer Elizabeth Murray
Elizabeth Murray
Retired lawyer and the author of Holding on to Mamie:  My Mother, Dementia and Me.
For more information about Elizabeth and her story visit www.holdingontomamie.ca.

CarePartners has taken action for dementia!

CarePartners has taken action for dementia!

With over 200,000 people in Ontario living with dementia today, we need an Ontario dementia strategy to make sure that our communities receive the support they need. The Alzheimer Society of Ontario has led the movement to have a fully-funded dementia strategy included in the Ontario government’s 2017 budget, and we are now awaiting the upcoming announcement of the budget.

In support of our initiative, CarePartners has generously donated not only financially, but their time as well, to help build awareness and promote the importance of an Ontario Dementia Strategy. With their exceptional support, we have been able to increase awareness amongst policy makers and influencers and the need for a strategy to be included in this year’s budget.

The partnership between CarePartners and the Alzheimer Society of Ontario began with the shared value of great care for people living with dementia. CarePartners explains,

“CarePartners is committed to providing quality care for patients with a dementia diagnosis living in the community and to providing support for their families. Our partnership with the ASO (Alzheimer Society of Ontario) provides our health professionals with education and access to resources; both of these contribute greatly to ensuring that the care our staff provides is always skilled, compassionate and built on proven best practices.”
-Brittany Robins, CarePartners

To have an Ontario Dementia Strategy will be integral to help support partnerships like this, which help to make sure that people with dementia receive the best care possible.

Thanks to supporters like CarePartners, we have been able to raise awareness about the need for a dementia strategy to many members of parliament, but we need to make sure that a fully-funded strategy is incorporated in the government’s budget. Be sure to write to your MPP today and tell them that we need a fully-funded dementia strategy!

For more information about CarePartners and the services they offer, visit their website at www.carepartners.ca

Is it time to move to long-term care?

Is it time to move to long-term care?

You survived the holidays and you’re now getting back into your regular routine. For many people, the holidays are a time to get together with friends and relatives that you haven’t seen in a while. As joyful as these gatherings can be, they can also bring new worries. You may have noticed that your father seems more forgetful.  Perhaps your aunt’s dementia seems to be getting worse.  Or, a dear friend may have seemed frailer than you remembered.

We try to care for relatives and friends in our own homes for as long as possible.  But when a person has dementia, this can be especially challenging. Even families who are well resourced and living close to each other often struggle to support someone who needs a lot of care at home until the end of life.

As difficult as it is, moving to a long-term care home is more the norm than the exception for families of someone with dementia. Research shows that 57% of seniors living in a residential care home have Alzheimer’s disease and/or another form of dementia. And, 70% of people with dementia will eventually die in a nursing home.

At the Alzheimer Society, people who have dementia often tell us they worry about someday moving into long-term care.  Their families tell us that it can be the hardest decision they’ll ever make:  “How will I know it is time?” “What about the promises we made to care for each other until the end?”  “How do I choose a home?” “How much will it cost?” “Will my partner get the care she needs?”

That’s why the Alzheimer Society has created a new series of checklists to help families know what to ask and look for when choosing a long-term care home, and how to adjust to the transition. These come in four easy-to-use brochures with lots of practical tips:

  • Considering the move to a long-term care home
  • Preparing for a move
  • Handling moving day, and
  • Adjusting after a move

You can download these free resources in English at www.alzheimer.ca/longtermcare and in French at www.alzheimer.ca/soinsdelongueduree from the Alzheimer Society of Canada’s website.

You can also get printed copies from your local Alzheimer Society. To find the Alzheimer Society closest to you, please visit: www.alzheimer.ca/en/provincial-office-directory or call toll free: 1-800-616-8816.

Research Video Series: Introducing Stephanie Chamberlain

Research Video Series: Introducing Stephanie Chamberlain


Trained as a personal support worker in long-term care, Stephanie Chamberlain is currently pursuing her PhD at the University of Alberta. There, she is assessing the impact of court-appointed public guardianship on the health and care needs of long-term care residents. Stephanie is the Alzheimer Society Research Program’s first Revera Scholar.

It is essential that we improve quality of life and quality of care to those with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia because how we treat a life that has been lived is reflective of our essential humanity.
-Stephanie Chamberlain

Stephanie Chamberlain

Revera Scholar Doctoral Award in Alzheimer’s disease (Quality of Life) – $66,000
Project: Unrepresented older adults: The impact of public guardianship on resident health and care needs in long-term care

Read about more of our grants and awards recipients here.

Erica’s story

Erica’s story

I was ten years old when I first noticed the problem. My whole family was attending my brother’s hockey game on a typical Thursday night. My Papa came to every game since I could remember. As we prepared to leave, there was only one person missing, my Papa Joe.

With no sign of him in the arena, we went out into the parking lot to check if he was taking a minute and having a smoke. But to our surprise his car was gone. Confusion ensued because he never left without congratulating my brother on his performance. Luckily, not long after, he came back. He had thought he was meeting us at the house but when he got there remembered the hockey game.

Alzheimer’s is hard on a family. It’s not something you want to admit is happening and is even harder to see someone you love have to go through. In 2009 it struck my family. My Papa Joe was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s as well as lung cancer. Then, in 2013, he moved into a long-term facility.

This was especially hard on my Nana. She didn’t want to admit she couldn’t take care of him full-time and the stress that it brought, with her worrying through the days and nights, was too much. The truth is my Papa couldn’t be left alone. At the long-term care facility he is able to get 24/7 assistance. But still, my Nana takes him his coffee and muffin for breakfast every day and makes sure she’s there when he’s going to sleep.

Over the years, he has had good days where he’s more coherent and then bad days where he shuts himself away. This year, however, his memory has begun to deteriorate rapidly to the point that he is unsure who I am when I walk into the room and he has trouble speaking. But the one thing that never changes is his sense of humour and that’s something I will always cherish. No matter what has happened he can always laugh about it.

That being said, there are still tough times. My Papa loves going for drives and he’s chatty throughout the whole ride. The toughest part is bringing him home, and having the same conversation about where we are taking him. Even though I know it’s coming, it doesn’t make it easier.

Alzheimer’s disease doesn’t have a cure, but there are ways to help reduce the risk. Go out and be socially and physically active. Live a healthy lifestyle and don’t wait until you are older. You can try and prevent it now.

Erica StevensonErica Stevenson