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Category: Advocacy and Public Policy

Four reasons to celebrate

Four reasons to celebrate

By Pauline Tardif, CEO, Alzheimer Society of Canada Every day, I hear the stories of Canadians who are living with the realities of dementia in all its forms, whether they are experiencing the disease first-hand or as caregivers. I learn about successes—and failures—in research. I digest statistics and information to help me understand the ever-growing scope and magnitude of what we are facing as a country when it comes to Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. It can be overwhelming at…

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“Stigma can happen anytime and anywhere.” Why it’s important to know about our attitudes to dementia.

“Stigma can happen anytime and anywhere.” Why it’s important to know about our attitudes to dementia.

What do you think about dementia? Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) is conducting the world’s largest survey on people’s attitudes towards dementia. Whether you’re a person living with dementia, a caregiver, a health-care professional—or someone just interested in learning more about dementia, no personal stake required—ADI wants to hear from you! Take the survey now What makes this survey so important? For one thing, there’s never been anything like it before—it’s a truly global survey that encompasses attitudes and beliefs toward…

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Let’s talk about help for today

Let’s talk about help for today

When I last spoke with you, I asked what you thought about dementia research in Canada and the challenges we face together. Supporters like you, speaking from your own personal experience, agreed that this isn’t a tomorrow problem for Canada—it’s our problem today! Today, I’m reaching out again to give you an update and ask for more of your insights. An update on the national dementia strategy As CEO of the Alzheimer Society of Canada, I am pleased to have…

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What does the Charter mean to Roger?

What does the Charter mean to Roger?

Roger Marple resides in Alberta. He lives with dementia. Roger, an advocate for dementia awareness, is a member of the Advisory Group that created the Canadian Charter of Rights for People with Dementia. He was also one of the faces of Alzheimer’s Awareness Month this past January. Read what Roger thinks about the Charter below: Our Constitution is the supreme law of Canada. Our Charter of Rights and Freedoms is a part of that constitution, thus making it the most…

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What does the Charter mean to Mario?

What does the Charter mean to Mario?

Mario Gregorio resides in British Columbia. He lives with dementia. An advocate for dementia awareness, Mario is a member of the Alzheimer Society’s Advisory Group that created the Canadian Charter of Rights for People with Dementia. Mario was one of the many faces of Alzheimer’s Awareness Month this past January. Read what Mario thinks about the Charter below: After hearing the neurologist tell me that I had vascular dementia and possibly Alzheimer’s, my hopes and dreams of traveling crashed. The…

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What does the Charter mean to Marilyn?

What does the Charter mean to Marilyn?

Marilyn Taylor lives with Alzheimer’s disease. She’s a member of the Alzheimer Society’s Advisory Group that created the Canadian Charter of Rights for People with Dementia. Marilyn grew up in Alberta where she worked in the oil and gas industry for 20 years. After her mother was diagnosed with cancer, she moved to Nova Scotia to take care of her. A mom, stepmom, grandma, and great-grandma, Marilyn enjoys living independently with her dog and cat who insist on going out…

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What does the Charter mean to Jim?

What does the Charter mean to Jim?

Jim Mann resides in British Columbia. He lives with dementia. Jim is a member of the Alzheimer Society’s Advisory Group who created the Charter of Rights for People with Dementia. He is also on the Ministerial Advisory Board on Dementia, which will advise on the development of Canada’s first national dementia strategy. Read what Jim thinks about the Charter below: The phrase “actions speak louder than words” was given credence with the development of the Canadian Charter of Rights for…

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Let’s talk about research

Let’s talk about research

Today, I’m reaching out because I want to know what you think about dementia research in Canada. Your own experience and the wisdom of your insights can help the Alzheimer Society amplify the voices of people like you – ensuring that these voices are heard and action is taken. I hope you will join the conversation. Since coming on board as CEO, the goodwill, expressions of support and advice from individuals across the country have been heartwarming and deeply appreciated….

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“I am a person with dementia and a person with rights.” (part three)

“I am a person with dementia and a person with rights.” (part three)

Previously in our series on human rights and dementia, we looked at how past experiences inspired Phyllis Fehr to advocate for dementia rights (Part one: Becoming a force for change—Phyllis Fehr’s story). Then, Phyllis showed us how seven articles in the United Nations’ Convention of Human Rights can improve the quality of life for Canadians living with dementia right now (Part two: Understanding dementia from a human rights’ perspective).

“I am a person with dementia and a person with rights.” (Part two)

“I am a person with dementia and a person with rights.” (Part two)

When we last left Phyllis Fehr, we heard about how her experiences inspired her to take on her current role as a leading advocate for human rights for people with dementia. (If you haven’t yet, check out part one of this series, Becoming a force for change—Phyllis Fehr’s story.) One of Phyllis’ current focuses is the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, an international human rights treaty that was adopted by the United Nations almost a decade ago….

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