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Meet our Researchers: April Khademi, Ryerson University

Meet our Researchers: April Khademi, Ryerson University

Dementia is a complicated umbrella of diseases. Whether it’s the science of the brain itself, or the quality of life issues that affect people with dementia and their caregivers, there are many different and difficult challenges to consider. It’s not surprising then, that there are a number of different areas within dementia research—everything from diagnosis to therapy to caregiver support. The variety of challenges that come with the disease means that dementia researchers must be able to cover a wide…

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Your support at work: Dr. Daniel Sparks’ research is helping narrow down on the cause of Alzheimer’s disease

Your support at work: Dr. Daniel Sparks’ research is helping narrow down on the cause of Alzheimer’s disease

Our 2017 Alzheimer Society Research Program recipients are hard at work building cutting-edge insights into the treatment for Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Daniel Sparks is bringing novel insights that may narrow down on the cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Support researchers like Daniel today. The Alzheimer Society Research Program funds new research initiatives every year, targeting two types of research: Biomedical and Quality of Life. Since its inception, the program has funded an incredible $53 million in grants and awards. Last year,…

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Clearing the air about cannabis and dementia

Clearing the air about cannabis and dementia

As Canada dives headfirst into the legalization of cannabis, there has been rising interest in its potential medicinal benefits, including its therapeutic use for people with Alzheimer’s disease. Over the past decade, researchers and clinicians have investigated the effects of cannabinoids, the chemical compounds in the cannabis plant that give it its medicinal and recreational properties. One of the things they have studied is whether cannabinoids can reduce agitation. We know that agitation is a common change in behaviour in…

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Let’s talk about research

Let’s talk about research

Today, I’m reaching out because I want to know what you think about dementia research in Canada. Your own experience and the wisdom of your insights can help the Alzheimer Society amplify the voices of people like you – ensuring that these voices are heard and action is taken. I hope you will join the conversation. Since coming on board as CEO, the goodwill, expressions of support and advice from individuals across the country have been heartwarming and deeply appreciated….

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Meet our Researchers: Simon Duchesne, Université Laval

Meet our Researchers: Simon Duchesne, Université Laval

As a biomedical engineer, I don’t have your typical background for someone researching Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. In fact, if you had told me 18 years ago that dementia would be my main field of research, I’d be surprised. Back then, I was most interested in diagnostic radiology—the field of medicine that uses imaging exams to aid in diagnosis—for the planning of epilepsy surgery.

Meet our Researchers: Fernanda de Felice, Queen’s University

Meet our Researchers: Fernanda de Felice, Queen’s University

Who would I be without my memories? I consider the treatment of dementia to be one of the greatest current and future health challenges, and I am keen to find ways to protect the brain from the devastating effects of Alzheimer’s disease. However, there’s a lot we still don’t about this disease. I think a key step is to try to diagnose the disease as early as possible before a lot of damage occurs in the brain, so you’re able…

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Meet our Researchers: Debra Sheets, University of Victoria

Meet our Researchers: Debra Sheets, University of Victoria

For people with dementia and their caregivers, it can be difficult to find activities that strike the right balance between being supportive, being socially appropriate and, of course, being fun. As the disease progresses and abilities change, it’s common for friends to withdraw and activities to start to fall away. A person is left with few things that can offer joy, a sense of purpose and human connection. I’ve seen this firsthand—my father had dementia for 18 years. As it…

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Meet our Researchers: Matt Parsons, Memorial University

Meet our Researchers: Matt Parsons, Memorial University

Ever since my first undergraduate neuroscience course, I’ve always been fascinated by the ways in which the brain forms and retains memories. Recently, however, I’ve had the misfortune of seeing first-hand the cruel progression of cognitive decline in family members with dementia. So, my desire to research Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is fueled by my personal connection; by my passion for how we learn and make memories; and by my strong belief that by increasing our understanding of how…

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This February, put your brain health first

This February, put your brain health first

February is National Heart Health month, and did you know your heart and brain health are directly related? As part of the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA), researcher Dr. Carol Greenwood and her team have been studying how lifestyle can become a risk factor for dementia, and whether changes to lifestyle – even later in life – can lower that risk. “Thankfully, we can say that lifestyle, which includes activity and diet, absolutely impacts both the heart and…

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Let’s talk about dementia, mental illness and mental health

Let’s talk about dementia, mental illness and mental health

January 31 is Bell Let’s Talk Day, an initiative to encourage conversations, increase awareness and end the stigma around mental illness. One aspect of the conversation that’s not often talked about is mental health among older adults and seniors, and how this intersects with dementia. So today, let’s talk about it. Here are five things you should know about dementia, mental illness and mental health: 1) Dementia caregivers experience higher rates of depression than all other caregivers. Did you know…

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