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Category: Programs and Services

Boost your brain with Minds in Motion®

Boost your brain with Minds in Motion®

We all know that a healthy lifestyle is important for reducing our risk of dementia and many other chronic diseases. But did you know that it’s equally important for people who already have a diagnosis of dementia? Research shows that lifestyle choices such as healthy eating, staying social, challenging your brain and being physically active can improve quality of life, may help to slow the progression of the disease and can improve your capacity to cope with some of the…

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CarePartners has taken action for dementia!

CarePartners has taken action for dementia!

With over 200,000 people in Ontario living with dementia today, we need an Ontario dementia strategy to make sure that our communities receive the support they need. The Alzheimer Society of Ontario has led the movement to have a fully-funded dementia strategy included in the Ontario government’s 2017 budget, and we are now awaiting the upcoming announcement of the budget. In support of our initiative, CarePartners has generously donated not only financially, but their time as well, to help build…

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‘We have so much to learn from our grandparents’: A teen’s perspective on Alzheimer’s

‘We have so much to learn from our grandparents’: A teen’s perspective on Alzheimer’s

Marilyn Lemay loved the outdoors and would spend every waking moment there. Inherently creative, she crafted, embroidered, quilted and painted everything in sight. If you stand still for more than a moment, her 17-year-old granddaughter Deborah jokes, Marilyn just might paint you. Some of that changed eight years ago, when Marilyn was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Deborah’s grandfather Ron moved from their beloved Elliot Lake home to be closer to Deborah’s mother and family. Managing Marilyn’s care himself wasn’t an…

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Dementia under 65: Where do they fit in?

Dementia under 65: Where do they fit in?

It was love at first sight when Sandy met Doug. They had both ended long marriages. They shared a passion for work, a love of travel, and had compatible plans for retirement. They clicked instantly. The McLean’s married two years later and were in the midst of living the lives they’d dreamed of when Doug, a top executive, lost his job because of increased anxiety and diminishing cognitive abilities. Things didn’t get better. Doug became depressed and delusional. He could no longer tell time or do math, and he struggled with his…

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Finding Your Way® – Living Safely in the Community

Finding Your Way® – Living Safely in the Community

The Alzheimer Society of Ontario hosted its second annual Finding Your Way®  Provincial Forum on Thursday March 10th. Close to 100 people came together to see how we all can help people with dementia live safely in the community. Many partnering organizations were represented – supportive housing providers, retirement home staff as well as paramedics and other first responders. The Alzheimer Society was happy to see such an interest from our partners. The Hon. Mario Sergio, Minister Responsible for Seniors…

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Cornwall community stepping up to become Dementia Friends

Cornwall community stepping up to become Dementia Friends

One of our core objectives here at the Alzheimer Society of Cornwall and District is to continue to look for new ways to make life better for those living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias.  One way we are looking to bring people closer together is through the Dementia Friends campaign.  As many of you already know, a Dementia Friend is someone who learns a little bit more about what it’s like to live with dementia and then turns that understanding…

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Alzheimer Society of Ontario receives accreditation!

Alzheimer Society of Ontario receives accreditation!

Hello supporters, I’m excited to share some great news with you! Late last year, staff at the Alzheimer Society of Ontario voluntarily put our key processes, services and strategies through a rigorous assessment by Accreditation Canada. We were evaluated in all aspects of being both a health-care organization and a non-profit. And we have just heard that we have received a full four-year Accreditation! This is a great accomplishment for our organization and demonstrates to you our commitment to being…

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Minds in Motion® boosts brain health

Minds in Motion® boosts brain health

At the Alzheimer Society of London-Middlesex we have many social recreation programs such as art, gardening, cooking, knitting, and scrapbooking. But before Minds in Motion®, we did not have one that focused on group exercise and healthy living. This has been a great addition. Since we started Minds in Motion, people are seeing how exercise makes a huge difference for people with dementia. Just today I received a call from a client interested in the program. I had asked her…

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What is Aphasia?

What is Aphasia?

Imagine trying to tell someone where you are hurt or how you feel, but you can’t find the words or phrases to get across what you are trying to say. How would this impact your relationships with friends and family and all the other aspects of life where communication is essential? This condition – when someone knows what he or she wants to say but cannot express it – is called aphasia. Aphasia is most often the result of stroke…

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5 ways you can be dementia–friendly in your community

5 ways you can be dementia–friendly in your community

There are many ways you can be a friend to people with dementia in your community, whether it’s in conversation or looking out for someone’s safety. Check out these 5 tips, then visit www.dementiafriends.ca to become a Dementia Friend. 1) Communicate clearly Speak clearly and use short, simple sentences. Be sure not to speak too quickly or raise your voice. Remember that a person with dementia may not understand what you’re doing or remember what you’ve said. Be respectful and…

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