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Canada to become 30th country with national dementia strategy

Canada to become 30th country with national dementia strategy

The Alzheimer Society of Canada celebrates the passage of Bill C-233, An Act respecting a national strategy for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Canada will now become the latest country to develop a national dementia strategy to address the overwhelming scale, impact and cost of dementia.

“For the more than half a million Canadians living with dementia and their families, this is an important milestone,” says Pauline Tardif, CEO of the Alzheimer Society of Canada. “A national strategy enables a coordinated approach to tackling dementia in Canada that will impact the lives of those affected in tangible ways.”

Bill C-233’s co-sponsors, the Honourable Rob Nicholson, MP Niagara Falls, and Rob Oliphant, MP Don Valley West, are to be commended for their leadership and support, as is the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science, and Technology. They have been dedicated champions of the Bill on behalf of Canadians living with dementia, their families, and caregivers.

The Alzheimer Society has long called for a national dementia strategy to enhance research efforts and ensure access to quality care and support so that Canadians with dementia can have the best quality of life. Now that Canada has committed to such a strategy, work begins on implementation.

The Society and its federation partners look forward to continuing to work collaboratively with government, stakeholders and, above all, people living with dementia, to create and implement Canada’s first national dementia strategy.

To learn more, visit www.alzheimer.ca/advocacy.


LE CANADA VA DEVENIR LE TRENTIÈME PAYS DOTÉ D’UNE STRATÉGIE NATIONALE SUR LES MALADIES COGNITIVES

Parliament of Canada

La Société Alzheimer du Canada salue l’adoption du Projet de loi C-233, la Loi concernant une stratégie nationale sur la maladie d’Alzheimer et d’autres démences. Le Canada va maintenant devenir le dernier pays à mettre sur pied une stratégie nationale sur les maladies cognitives pour répondre à l’ampleur, l’impact et au coût de ces maladies.

« Pour les plus de cinq cent mille Canadiens atteints de la maladie d’Alzheimer ou d’une maladie apparentée et leurs familles, il s’agit là d’un jalon important, a déclaré Pauline Tardif, chef de la direction de la Société Alzheimer du Canada. Une stratégie nationale nous permet d’avoir une approche coordonnée pour aborder les maladies cognitives au Canada, ce qui aura des impacts concrets sur la vie des personnes touchées. »

Il convient de féliciter les co-parrains du Projet de loi C-233, l’honorable Rob Nicholson, député de Niagara Falls, et Rob Oliphant, député de Don Valley West, pour leur leadership et leur soutien, tout comme les membres du Comité sénatorial permanent des affaires sociales, des sciences et de la technologie. Ils ont été des champions dévoués au projet de loi au nom des Canadiens touchés par la maladie, des familles et des aidants.

La Société Alzheimer réclame depuis longtemps une stratégie nationale sur les maladies cognitives afin de renforcer les efforts de recherche et assurer l’accès à des aides et des soins de qualité pour que les Canadiens touchés par la maladie puissent jouir d’une qualité de vie optimale. Maintenant que le Canada s’est engagé dans la voie d’une telle stratégie, le travail commence pour la mettre en place.

La Société et les partenaires de la Fédération se réjouissent à l’idée de continuer à collaborer avec le gouvernement, les intervenants, et, par-dessus tout, les personnes touchées par la maladie d’Alzheimer et les maladies apparentées afin de mettre au point et d’instaurer la première stratégie nationale qui y est consacrée au Canada.

Pour en apprendre davantage, rendez-vous à www.alzheimer.ca/defensedesinterets.

This election, support a National Dementia Strategy

This election, support a National Dementia Strategy

On October 19, 2015 the Canadian federal election will be held. And we want to reaffirm that every vote matters.
On May 6 of this year, our chance for a national dementia strategy becoming enshrined into Canadian law through MP Claude Gravelle’s private member’s bill C-356 was sadly defeated 140-139. Yes, by one vote.

When we hear about people who think votes don’t matter it’s disheartening, because regardless of context, every vote matters. Right now, each one of us gets to choose who we want to lead our country at a time when dementia is prevalent everywhere and answers are nowhere.

The Ontario Dementia Advisory Group (ODAG) is a group of people living with dementia who formed in Fall 2014 with the purpose of influencing policies, practices, and people to ensure that we, people living with dementia, are included in every decision that affects our lives.

When you have dementia, you worry about the time. How much time do you have before you: get worse; are moved into a long-term care facility; are unable to participate in committees; you die.

Yes, research is important. But so is our current living ability. We need an integrated national dementia strategy which will help support the provincial strategy here in Ontario and in the other provinces that have recognized dementia as a priority. Canadians had that within our reach. One vote stopped it.

ODAG worked very hard pushing for support of bill 356. Our effort included sending 80 individual emails to Ontario Conservative MP’s and helping the North West Dementia Working Group also send out 80 individual emails. The response was one aggressive email from a Conservative MP. This is beyond unprofessional and unacceptable. We are angered to hear that Liberal MP Yvonne Jones forgot to vote. Her vote would have passed the bill. And where were the NDP MP’s who decided not to go to work that day? Again, we needed just one vote.

This was not a straight split among parties. Nine Conservative MP’s did their homework and supported C-356. The Conservative government claimed the bill encroached on provincial health-care jurisdiction and instead put forth a motion that states dementia as a priority with no requirement for action from government.

MP votes matter. Citizen votes matter. It is paramount that people understand the importance of each vote and listen to what people who have firsthand experience of dementia want. People with dementia across Canada need the next federal government to take dementia seriously. The provinces are moving ahead on the development of local dementia strategies with a glaring absence of national leadership on the most pressing health and social challenge of our time. So we ask your candidates what they will do to support the people with dementia in your community and what their party will do for those affected across Canada.

Come October 19th, YOUR vote can send the message that as a Canadian citizen you demand a national dementia strategy. We need action and it’s in your hands.

Learn more about what you can do.

Sincerely,

From left to right, three members of the Dementia Advisory Group. Bea Kraayenhof, Bill Heibein and Maisie Jackson alongside MPP Indira Naidoo-Harris. The other two members are Mary Beth Wighton and Phyllis Fehr

Ontario Dementia Advisory Group (ODAG)

From left to right, three members of the Dementia Advisory Group. Bea Kraayenhof, Bill Heibein and Maisie Jackson alongside MPP Indira Naidoo-Harris. The other two members (not pictured) are Mary Beth Wighton and Phyllis Fehr