Erica’s story

Erica’s story

I was ten years old when I first noticed the problem. My whole family was attending my brother’s hockey game on a typical Thursday night. My Papa came to every game since I could remember. As we prepared to leave, there was only one person missing, my Papa Joe.

With no sign of him in the arena, we went out into the parking lot to check if he was taking a minute and having a smoke. But to our surprise his car was gone. Confusion ensued because he never left without congratulating my brother on his performance. Luckily, not long after, he came back. He had thought he was meeting us at the house but when he got there remembered the hockey game.

Alzheimer’s is hard on a family. It’s not something you want to admit is happening and is even harder to see someone you love have to go through. In 2009 it struck my family. My Papa Joe was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s as well as lung cancer. Then, in 2013, he moved into a long-term facility.

This was especially hard on my Nana. She didn’t want to admit she couldn’t take care of him full-time and the stress that it brought, with her worrying through the days and nights, was too much. The truth is my Papa couldn’t be left alone. At the long-term care facility he is able to get 24/7 assistance. But still, my Nana takes him his coffee and muffin for breakfast every day and makes sure she’s there when he’s going to sleep.

Over the years, he has had good days where he’s more coherent and then bad days where he shuts himself away. This year, however, his memory has begun to deteriorate rapidly to the point that he is unsure who I am when I walk into the room and he has trouble speaking. But the one thing that never changes is his sense of humour and that’s something I will always cherish. No matter what has happened he can always laugh about it.

That being said, there are still tough times. My Papa loves going for drives and he’s chatty throughout the whole ride. The toughest part is bringing him home, and having the same conversation about where we are taking him. Even though I know it’s coming, it doesn’t make it easier.

Alzheimer’s disease doesn’t have a cure, but there are ways to help reduce the risk. Go out and be socially and physically active. Live a healthy lifestyle and don’t wait until you are older. You can try and prevent it now.

Erica StevensonErica Stevenson

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