Can meditation slow down cognitive decline? Neuropsychologist Dr. Carol Hudon and Psychologist Dr. Sonia Goulet aim to find out

Can meditation slow down cognitive decline? Neuropsychologist Dr. Carol Hudon and Psychologist Dr. Sonia Goulet aim to find out

Memory lapses in early stage Alzheimer’s disease have been linked to depression, anxiety, and stress. As recipients of a Quality of Life research grant through the Alzheimer Society Research Program (ASRP), Hudon and Goulet want to know if mindfulness meditation cannot only relieve those symptoms, but if it might actually slow down cognitive decline. This year, the ASRP celebrates 29 years of funding Canadian researchers in the field of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Through the results of their research,…

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Caregiver tax guide: What’s the difference between a tax credit and tax deduction?

Caregiver tax guide: What’s the difference between a tax credit and tax deduction?

March in Ontario can be a drag: Our New Year’s resolutions are losing their spark, flu season has taken a toll, and now we’re about to be hit by the dreaded Tax Season. Not to worry, we have some information to help you through the Tax Blues. The good news: If you’re a caregiver in Ontario, you may be eligible for caregiver tax credits! We reached out to Glenn Hayter of Hayter and Associates Inc., Certified Financial Planner, to get…

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Caregiver tax guide: The Canada Caregiver Credit – What’s New?

Caregiver tax guide: The Canada Caregiver Credit – What’s New?

There is no question that caregivers are the unsung heroes of Ontario’s health system. While we can’t send you all a certificate of our appreciation, we can point you in the direction of some helpful caregiver tax credits that may relieve the financial burden that comes with caregiving. The Canada Caregiver Credit (CCC) is a tax credit that is made available to people residing in Canada who must submit an Income Tax Return. It’s provincial counterpart, the Ontario Caregiver Credit…

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Meet the researchers: Matt Parsons, Memorial University

Meet the researchers: Matt Parsons, Memorial University

Ever since my first undergraduate neuroscience course, I’ve always been fascinated by the ways in which the brain forms and retains memories. Recently, however, I’ve had the misfortune of seeing first-hand the cruel progression of cognitive decline in family members with dementia. So, my desire to research Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is fueled by my personal connection; by my passion for how we learn and make memories; and by my strong belief that by increasing our understanding of how…

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This February, put your brain health first

This February, put your brain health first

February is National Heart Health month, and did you know your heart and brain health are directly related? As part of the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA), researcher Dr. Carol Greenwood and her team have been studying how lifestyle can become a risk factor for dementia, and whether changes to lifestyle – even later in life – can lower that risk. “Thankfully, we can say that lifestyle, which includes activity and diet, absolutely impacts both the heart and…

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Let’s talk about dementia, mental illness and mental health

Let’s talk about dementia, mental illness and mental health

January 31 is Bell Let’s Talk Day, an initiative to encourage conversations, increase awareness and end the stigma around mental illness. One aspect of the conversation that’s not often talked about is mental health among older adults and seniors, and how this intersects with dementia. So today, let’s talk about it. Here are five things you should know about dementia, mental illness and mental health: 1) Dementia caregivers experience higher rates of depression than all other caregivers. Did you know…

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“I am a person with dementia and a person with rights.” (Part one)

“I am a person with dementia and a person with rights.” (Part one)

Part one: Becoming a force for change—Phyllis Fehr’s story This blog series is based on the webinar, “I am a person with dementia and a person with rights,” hosted by brainXchange and presented by Phyllis Fehr on December 13, 2017 (part one) and January 17, 2018 (part two). One day, Phyllis Fehr walked through the doors of a grocery store, and found confusion. Phyllis, who had been given a working diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s along with Lewy Body dementia at…

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“People living with Alzheimer’s disease are still people”

“People living with Alzheimer’s disease are still people”

Two Alzheimer’s diagnoses, decades apart, show how much has changed—and how much stays the same—when a family navigates dementia. Sharon and her mother, Esther, were very close. “My mother and I used to talk three times each day. One of the first signs that my mother might have dementia was when I noticed she would forget to call me.” The warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease were well-known to Sharon; it wasn’t the first time that her family had received the…

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The importance of palliative care for people living with dementia

The importance of palliative care for people living with dementia

In her opening remarks to the Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology, Alzheimer Society of Canada CEO Pauline Tardif led with an alarming fact. “Right now, well over half a million Canadians are living with dementia—and the numbers keep growing,” she said. “Access to palliative care has become even more important today.” Pauline had taken to Parliament Hill to support Bill C-277, An Act providing for the development of a framework on palliative care in Canada. If passed,…

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Caregiver tips for the holidays

Caregiver tips for the holidays

The leaves are changing, the days are feeling frosty, and decorations are making their way across homes and storefronts. Though the holiday season is enjoyable for many, it can be a stressful time for families affected by Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias, multiple sclerosis, or Parkinson’s disease. Here are some tips that can help make the holidays more enjoyable—for everyone.