Researcher Sarah Wu is doing something about dementia, and starting in the dining room

Researcher Sarah Wu is doing something about dementia, and starting in the dining room

You may already know that there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease. While some researchers are diligently looking for effective treatments, others are looking at more social models of care. Many Alzheimer Society Research Program grant recipients are working toward a friendlier future for those living with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias. What does relationship-centred care for someone living with Alzheimer’s look like? University of Waterloo doctorate student Sarah Wu is investigating long-term care, and searching for opportunities that may…

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7 important reasons to make a will right now (and what happens if you die without one)

7 important reasons to make a will right now (and what happens if you die without one)

Planning for the future is important for everyone, but it’s especially important if you or someone you care about has dementia. That’s why we’ve partnered with RBC Wealth Management Estate & Trust Services to bring you a series of informative blogs about estate planning. In this blog, Elaine Blades, Senior Manager, Professional Practice Group, RBC Estate & Trust Services, explains why it’s so important for everyone to have a will, and what you risk by not having one. By Elaine…

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Boost your brain with Minds in Motion®

Boost your brain with Minds in Motion®

We all know that a healthy lifestyle is important for reducing our risk of dementia and many other chronic diseases. But did you know that it’s equally important for people who already have a diagnosis of dementia? Research shows that lifestyle choices such as healthy eating, staying social, challenging your brain and being physically active can improve quality of life, may help to slow the progression of the disease and can improve your capacity to cope with some of the…

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Meet the researchers: Jordan Ali, University of Victoria

Meet the researchers: Jordan Ali, University of Victoria

Jordan Ali is working diligently to give voice to the experiences of those with subjective cognitive decline (SCD). This PhD student from the University of Victoria aims to develop profiles of individuals with this condition, which may signal early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. This can be helpful to general practitioners and front-line support workers in identifying individuals who are at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Video Transcript: Hi, my name is Jordan Ali. My work relates to a phenomenon called…

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You are not alone!

You are not alone!

Life can change direction drastically when a family member or close friend is diagnosed with a chronic health condition like Alzheimer’s disease, another form of dementia, multiple sclerosis, or Parkinson’s disease. Your suspicions that something is wrong have been confirmed; now, you have to figure out how to support the person. You may have never had personal experience with any of these conditions. Suddenly, you find yourself going along to doctor’s appointments and feeling as if the doctor is speaking…

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Caregiver tips for Thanksgiving dinner

Caregiver tips for Thanksgiving dinner

Thanksgiving is more than just a turkey with all the fixings. It is a time to share thanks for all that we have been given and a time for togetherness with family and friends. If a loved one has Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, considerations can be made in advance to ensure an enjoyable holiday for all. Here are some Thanksgiving Dinner tips to help both people with dementia and their families during Thanksgiving:   1. Plan ahead There is a…

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Life with young onset dementia: What you need to know

Life with young onset dementia: What you need to know

What comes to mind when you think of a person with dementia? If you’re like most people, you picture an elderly person in the later stages of the disease. But here’s the thing: dementia doesn’t just happen to older people. While age is still the biggest risk factor, people in their 50s, 40s and even 30s can also develop dementia. We call this young onset dementia and it accounts for about 2-8% of all dementia cases. Right now, 16,000 Canadians…

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September 21st is World Alzheimer’s Day

September 21st is World Alzheimer’s Day

There are many ways to get involved and show your support of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia this month. One small act can make a remarkable difference to the men and women who are impacted by dementia. Top 5 ways you can make a difference this month: Learn more about Alzheimer’s disease. Understanding Alzheimer’s disease and dementia is the best way to help those that are impacted. Do you know the risks, prevention, and how to best support those with the…

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How tackling hearing loss could reduce your risk of dementia

How tackling hearing loss could reduce your risk of dementia

If you’re 65 or older, chances are you may have started noticing changes in your hearing: people mumbling when they talk, or needing to crank up the radio and television. Hearing loss as we age is common. But did you know that it’s also a risk factor for dementia? In a recent Lancet report which summarized nine key risk factors for dementia, hearing loss was ranked second on the list. The study found that addressing mid-life hearing loss alone could…

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AAIC 2017 reveals great strides in research

AAIC 2017 reveals great strides in research

By Nalini Sen, Director, Alzheimer Society Research Program I had the opportunity to attend this year’s annual Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) in London, UK. This conference brings together some of the world’s leading researchers and clinicians in dementia treatment, detection and prevention. And with a record number of presentations—3300 in all—I have to admit, I was awestruck. Here are a few takeaways I would like to share with you: Stress can age your brain How we manage stress is even…

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