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Tag: end of life

Living well…right to the end

Living well…right to the end

May 7 – 13, 2017 is National Hospice Palliative Care Week. Mary Schulz, Director of Education at the Alzheimer Society of Canada discusses some of the misconceptions about palliative care and why it’s important to have conversations about end-of-life.

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What will your legacy be?

What will your legacy be?

Death is a fact of life. Because the transition from life to death is an unknown, humans are full of fear. And fear drives us to avoidance. Even though there has been increasing media attention to end-of-life issues recently, we seem to live in a death-phobic, death-avoidance culture. While our television, movie and video game screens are often filled with images of violent death. And news reports remind us every day of various threats to life.

Can we shift our perceptions to think about our Legacy instead of our deaths? May is Leave a Legacy month in Canada.

May is national LEAVE A LEGACY™ month across Canada. LEAVE A LEGACY™ is a national public awareness program designed to encourage Canadians to leave a gift, primarily through their Will, to a charity of their choice and to raise awareness of the importance of including a charitable gift in the estate-planning process.

The main goal of estate planning is usually to have the greatest amount of one’s estate pass to the owner’s intended beneficiaries. This includes paying the least amount of taxes. A legacy gift can benefit your favourite charity while significantly helping your family save taxes.

We are living in a time when an unprecedented amount of wealth is being transferred from one generation to the next. According to the Canadian Association of Gift Planners, in the next two decades 3.5 million Canadians are expected to die, leaving an estimated $1.5 trillion to their families and community.

Recent data on estate planning

A recent Scotiabank study found that half (50 per cent) of Canadians have a Will and just over half of Canadians (54 per cent) said they have spoken to their family about their intentions for their Will. The study also found that only one third (33 per cent) of Canadians have a Power of Attorney for property, while 59 per cent do not have one and 8 per cent say they don’t know what it is.

The disturbing part is that 50 per cent of Canadians currently don’t have a Will. According to the LEAVE A LEGACY™ program, if this trend continues, about two million Canadians over the next two decade will end life without a Will to protect their assets and their families. Without a Will, people lose the ability to control distribution of their estate to their chosen beneficiaries!

A common myth is people think you have to be wealthy to make a legacy gift—this is simply not true. Anyone can arrange to leave a charitable gift from their estate, regardless of its size.

People give for many different reasons; to ensure their memory lives on, to ensure that their favorite charity is able to continue its important work, to minimize the tax liability that comes with the transfer of one’s estate to surviving family members.

You have the ability to help the lives of people with dementia and create a lasting legacy. Gifts left to the Alzheimer Society of Ontario gives us the security of future funds. This May, get into action, do your Will, leave a legacy and create a brighter future for communities across Canada. We are here to help, request our free Super Hero Estate Planner and Guide. Not all Super Heroes wear capes. At the Alzheimer Society our Super Heroes leave a gift in their Wills to fight our #1 foe – dementia. Take a stand. Get the job done. Protect and help others and gain peace of mind. To learn more, and to request a free estate planner and guide, go to alzsuperhero.ca

 

Written by:

Colleen Bradley Chief Development Officer, Planned Giving Alzheimer Society of Ontario
Colleen Bradley
Chief Development Officer, Planned Giving Alzheimer Society of Ontario

 

Is it time to move to long-term care?

Is it time to move to long-term care?

You survived the holidays and you’re now getting back into your regular routine. For many people, the holidays are a time to get together with friends and relatives that you haven’t seen in a while. As joyful as these gatherings can be, they can also bring new worries. You may have noticed that your father seems more forgetful.  Perhaps your aunt’s dementia seems to be getting worse.  Or, a dear friend may have seemed frailer than you remembered.

We try to care for relatives and friends in our own homes for as long as possible.  But when a person has dementia, this can be especially challenging. Even families who are well resourced and living close to each other often struggle to support someone who needs a lot of care at home until the end of life.

As difficult as it is, moving to a long-term care home is more the norm than the exception for families of someone with dementia. Research shows that 57% of seniors living in a residential care home have Alzheimer’s disease and/or another form of dementia. And, 70% of people with dementia will eventually die in a nursing home.

At the Alzheimer Society, people who have dementia often tell us they worry about someday moving into long-term care.  Their families tell us that it can be the hardest decision they’ll ever make:  “How will I know it is time?” “What about the promises we made to care for each other until the end?”  “How do I choose a home?” “How much will it cost?” “Will my partner get the care she needs?”

That’s why the Alzheimer Society has created a new series of checklists to help families know what to ask and look for when choosing a long-term care home, and how to adjust to the transition. These come in four easy-to-use brochures with lots of practical tips:

  • Considering the move to a long-term care home
  • Preparing for a move
  • Handling moving day, and
  • Adjusting after a move

You can download these free resources in English at www.alzheimer.ca/longtermcare and in French at www.alzheimer.ca/soinsdelongueduree from the Alzheimer Society of Canada’s website.

You can also get printed copies from your local Alzheimer Society. To find the Alzheimer Society closest to you, please visit: www.alzheimer.ca/en/provincial-office-directory or call toll free: 1-800-616-8816.