Browsed by
Tag: estate planning

If you can’t decide, who will decide for you?

If you can’t decide, who will decide for you?

Planning for the future is important for everyone, but it’s especially important if you or someone you care about has dementia. That’s why we’ve partnered with RBC Wealth Management Estate & Trust Services to bring you a series of informative blogs about estate planning. In this blog, Elaine Blades, Senior Manager, Professional Practice Group, RBC Estate & Trust Services, outlines the steps everyone should take to plan for incapacity.


Elaine Blades

By Elaine Blades, Senior Manager, Professional Practice Group, RBC Estate & Trust Services

Planning for incapacity is an important aspect of estate planning, yet is often overlooked. Many people mistakenly believe that estate planning equates to having a will. In reality, a comprehensive estate plan includes much more. Your will only takes effect after death…so what happens while you’re still living?

As our population ages and continues to live longer, more of us will likely be living with some form of cognitive impairment or dementia. And while a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia doesn’t mean that you must immediately stop making decisions, there will come a time when you will no longer be able to decide on your own. Having a plan in place makes things easier for your family when that time comes, and gives you the peace of mind that your wishes for health care, personal care and finances will be respected.

Here are the steps everyone can (and should) take to be prepared:

Appoint one or more substitute decision-makers

A substitute decision-maker will make decisions on your behalf in the event that you are incapable of deciding for yourself. Depending on where you live, this person might also be known as a “proxy”, “representative”, “agent”, or “power of attorney”*. Whichever term used, in every province there are two types: one for personal care, and one for management of property. You may choose to appoint the same person for both, or two different people, keeping in mind that they can require different skill sets.

For example, you may want someone with financial acumen to make decisions around your property, but someone else to make decisions around your personal care and health care. While your substitute decision-maker for personal care must be a person, you have the option to appoint a trust company to manage your property and financial decisions. Whatever you decide, the person or persons you appoint should be someone whom you trust to carry out your wishes.

It’s important to understand that the role of substitute decision-maker is different from the executor of your estate. There can be practical reasons for appointing the same person as executor and substitute decision-maker, but appointing one doesn’t automatically appoint the other.

If you don’t appoint a substitute decision-maker, most provinces and territories have a priority list, usually starting with family members—but here’s the thing: no one is automatically given this role. To be appointed, a person needs to apply to court, and this process can be complicated, time-consuming, and costly. For example, on the financial side, the applicant would need to file what is known as a “management plan,” which details all of your assets and how they will manage them.

It’s also important to note that the priority list used by the courts is arbitrary, and doesn’t take into account your personal family situation, or how close a person’s relationship was to you. That means that the person chosen by the courts may not be the person you would have wanted to make decisions on your behalf. Appointing a substitute decision-maker gives you the comfort of knowing that your care and property will be in good hands.

The process for appointing a substitute decision-maker varies across the country, so speak to a lawyer or your local Alzheimer Society to find out about the specific legal requirements in your province.

Ensure your wishes are known

Make an advance directive, or living will*

This is a document detailing your desires regarding your medical treatment in the event that you become incapable of communicating your wishes on your own. Note that this is not a legally binding document—it only serves as a guideline. It’s up to your health care providers and/or your substitute decision-maker to interpret your wishes and make decisions. So while an advance directive is an important part of your plan, it shouldn’t be the only part.

Discuss with your substitute decision-makers and family

It can be difficult to anticipate every possible eventuality in your advance directive, so it’s important to have conversations with substitute decision-makers about your values and wishes so that they can make the best decisions for you. Advance directives also focus only on medical care, but those aren’t the only types of decisions that will need to be made. Take the opportunity to speak openly and frankly with your substitute decision-maker about issues relating to future health care, personal care and financial decisions. Where do you want to live? What do you want to eat? Do you want financial resources to prioritize your comfort and well-being? Substitute decision-makers should know your preferences for things like language, food, hygiene, clothing, routines, activities, fears, likes and dislikes.

Don’t forget to discuss with the rest of your family, too. Ensuring that they are aware of your wishes can help avoid conflict between substitute decision-makers and other family members down the road.

Work with a professional

Don’t try to do this alone! Consult with a lawyer or your local Alzheimer Society to ensure all contingencies are covered and the appropriate legal paperwork is in place. Often, when a lawyer drafts your will, they will also include advance directive and substitute decision-maker paperwork as part of their services. This can be helpful for ensuring a smooth transition between living and after-life care and decision-making.

Revisit and revise regularly!

Just like a will, if you change your mind—so long as you remain capable—you can change your plan. There are also certain situations where you should revisit your plan—major life changes like marriage, divorce, children, health issues, deaths or moving to a different province should all prompt you to re-examine your estate plan.


It’s human nature to avoid talking about difficult topics like incapacity. But by actively preparing now, you can get on with your life knowing that future decisions about your personal care and property will be made easier for your family and reflect your wishes, beliefs and values.


*Laws and terminology vary from province to province. Contact your local Alzheimer Society for more information.

Additional resources:


This document has been prepared for use by the RBC Wealth Management member companies, RBC Dominion Securities Inc.*, RBC Phillips, Hager & North Investment Counsel Inc., Royal Trust Corporation of Canada and The Royal Trust Company (collectively, the “Companies”) and certain divisions of the Royal Bank of Canada. *Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Each of the Companies and the Royal Bank of Canada are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. The information provided in this document is not intended as, nor does it constitute, tax or legal advice. The information provided should only be used in conjunction with a discussion with a qualified legal, tax or other professional advisor when planning to implement a strategy. ® / TM Trademark(s) of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. ©Royal Bank of Canada 2017. All rights reserved.


Si vous ne pouvez pas décider… qui le fera à votre place?

Si vous ne pouvez pas décider… qui le fera à votre place?

Prévoir son avenir est important pour tous, mais ça l’est particulièrement si vous ou une personne dont vous prenez soin est atteinte d’une maladie cognitive. C’est pourquoi nous avons établi un partenariat avec les services Gestion de patrimoine, successions et fiducies de la banque RBC pour vous proposer une série de blogues informatifs sur la planification successorale. Dans ce blogue, Elaine Blades, la gestionnaire principale du groupe Pratique professionnelle des services Successions et fiducies de la banque RBC, explique les étapes que chacun devrait suivre pour prévoir l’avenir en cas d’incapacité.


Elaine Blades

Par Elaine Blades, gestionnaire principale, Groupe des pratiques professionnelles, Successions et fiducies à la banque RBC

Prévoir l’avenir en cas d’incapacité est un aspect important de la succession, mais il est souvent négligé. Nombreux sont ceux qui croient que la planification successorale équivaut à avoir un testament. En réalité, une planification successorale complète comprend bien plus que ça. Le testament ne prend effet qu’après le décès. Alors… qu’arrive-t-il de votre vivant?

Au fur et à mesure du vieillissement de la population et que ses membres continuent de vivre plus longtemps, de plus en plus d’entre nous vivront vraisemblablement avec une forme de trouble cognitif ou la maladie d’Alzheimer. Et, bien qu’un diagnostic de ces maladies ne signifie pas que vous devez immédiatement arrêter de prendre des décisions, il arrivera un moment où vous ne serez plus en mesure de décider de votre propre chef. Avoir un plan facilite les choses pour les membres de votre famille lorsque ce moment se présente. Un plan vous donne aussi la tranquillité d’esprit de savoir que vos souhaits en matière de soins de santé, de soins personnels et financiers seront respectés.

Voici les étapes que chacun doit (et devrait) prendre pour être prêt :

Nommez un ou plusieurs preneur(s) de décisions de remplacement

Un décideur substitut prendra des décisions en votre nom au cas où vous ne pourriez plus le faire seul. Selon l’endroit où vous habitez, on appelle aussi cette personne « mandataire », « représentant », « agent » ou « procuration »*. Quel que soit le terme utilisé, il en existe deux types dans chaque province : un pour les soins personnels et un autre pour la gestion des biens. Vous pouvez choisir de nommer la même personne pour les deux, ou deux personnes différentes, mais gardez à l’esprit que chaque aspect demande des compétences différentes.

Par exemple, vous souhaiterez peut-être nommer une personne ayant un sens des finances pour prendre des décisions concernant vos biens, mais en choisir une autre pour décider de vos soins personnels et sanitaires. Tandis que le décideur substitut qui prendra des décisions à votre place en matière de soins personnels doit être une personne physique, vous pouvez nommer une société de fiducie pour gérer vos biens et prendre vos décisions financières. Quelle que soit votre décision, la ou les personnes que vous nommez doivent être des personnes de confiance qui exécuteront vos volontés.

Il faut comprendre que le rôle d’un décideur substitut est différent de celui de l’exécuteur testamentaire. Il peut y avoir des raisons pratiques à nommer la même personne, mais la nomination de l’une n’entraîne pas automatiquement la nomination de l’autre.

Si vous ne nommez pas de décideur substitut, la plupart des provinces et territoires ont une liste des personnes prioritaires qui commence généralement avec les membres de la famille. Mais voilà : personne ne peut endosser automatiquement ce rôle. Pour être nommée, la personne doit en faire la demande auprès des tribunaux et ce processus peut être compliqué, long et coûteux. Par exemple, en ce qui concerne l’aspect financier, le demandeur doit déposer ce qui est connu sous le nom de « Plan de gestion ». Ce plan décrit vos actifs en détail et la manière dont ces derniers seront gérés.

Il convient aussi souligner que la liste des personnes prioritaires utilisée par les tribunaux est arbitraire et qu’elle ne prend pas en compte votre situation familiale personnelle ni la relation que vous entreteniez avec la personne. Cela signifie que la personne choisie par les tribunaux pourrait ne pas être celle que vous auriez souhaitée pour prendre les décisions en votre nom. Nommer un décideur substitut peut vous procurer le réconfort de savoir que vos soins et vos biens seront entre de bonnes mains.

Le processus pour nommer un décideur substitut varie dans le pays. Aussi, parlez-en à un avocat ou à votre Société Alzheimer régionale pour découvrir les dispositions juridiques particulières dans votre province.

Assurez-vous de faire connaître vos souhaits

Faites un testament de votre vivant ou établissez une directive préalable*

Il s’agit d’un document qui détaille vos souhaits au sujet de votre traitement médical dans le cas où vous êtes dans l’incapacité de communiquer vos souhaits. Veuillez noter qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un document juridiquement contraignant : il ne sert que de ligne directrice. Il appartient à vos fournisseurs de soins de santé et/ou votre décideur substitut d’interpréter vos souhaits et de prendre des décisions. Aussi, bien qu’une directive préalable constitue une partie importante de votre plan, elle ne doit pas être la seule.

Discutez avec votre décideur substitut et les membres de votre famille

Il peut être difficile d’anticiper tous les cas de figure dans votre directive préalable. Il est donc important d’avoir des conversations avec les décideurs substituts au sujet de vos valeurs et vos souhaits pour qu’ils puissent prendre les meilleures décisions pour vous. Les directives préalables ne se concentrent que sur les soins médicaux, mais ce ne sont pas là les seules décisions qui devront être prises. Prenez un moment pour discuter ouvertement et franchement avec votre décideur substitut au sujet d’enjeux relatifs aux soins de santé futurs, aux soins personnels et aux décisions financières. Où voulez-vous vivre? Que voulez-vous manger? Voulez-vous que vos ressources financières soient en priorité utilisées pour votre confort et votre bien-être? Les décideurs substituts doivent connaître vos préférences en matière de langue, nourriture, hygiène, vêtements, habitudes, activités, craintes, etc.

N’oubliez pas d’en parler également avec votre famille. S’assurer qu’ils connaissent vos souhaits peut aider à éviter des conflits entre les décideurs substituts et les autres membres de la famille à l’avenir.

Travaillez avec un professionnel

N’essayez pas de faire cela seul! Consultez un avocat ou votre Société Alzheimer régionale pour vous assurer que toutes les éventualités sont couvertes et que les documents juridiques qui conviennent sont prêts. Souvent, lorsqu’un avocat rédige votre testament, il inclura également une directive préalable ainsi que des documents relatifs au décideur substitut dans le cadre de ses services. Cela peut être utile pour assurer une transition sans encombre entre la prise de décision avant et après.

Réexaminez vos documents régulièrement!

Comme dans le cas d’un testament, si vous changez d’avis, vous pouvez changer votre plan (pour autant que vous en soyez capable). Il existe aussi certaines situations dans lesquelles vous devrez réexaminer votre plan. Par exemple, en cas de grands changements survenant dans votre vie, comme en cas de mariage, de divorce, d’enfants, de problèmes de santé, de décès ou de déménagement dans une autre province, etc. Ces changements devraient vous pousser à réexaminer votre planification successorale.


Il est dans la nature humaine de vouloir éviter d’aborder des sujets difficiles, comme l’incapacité. Mais en vous préparant activement dès à présent, vous pouvez continuer à vivre votre vie en sachant que vos décisions futures en matière de soins personnels et de biens seront facilitées pour votre famille et qu’elles reflèteront vos souhaits, croyances et valeurs.


*Les lois et la terminologie peuvent varier d’une province à l’autre. Contactez votre Société Alzheimer régionale pour de plus amples informations.

Ressources supplémentaires :


Ce document a été préparé(e) pour les sociétés membres de RBC Gestion de patrimoine, RBC Dominion valeurs mobilières Inc.*, RBC Phillips, Hager & North Services-conseils en placements inc., Société Trust Royal du Canada et Compagnie Trust Royal (collectivement, les « sociétés »). * Membre–Fonds canadien de protection des épargnants. Chacune des sociétés et Banque Royale du Canada sont des entités juridiques distinctes et affiliées. Les renseignements fournis dans ce document ne constituent pas des conseils fiscaux ou juridiques et ne doivent pas être interprétés comme tel. Les renseignements fournis ne doivent servir qu’à des fins de discussion avec un conseiller juridique ou fiscal qualifié ou un autre conseiller professionnel pour la planification de la mise en œuvre d’une stratégie. ® / MC Marque(s) de commerce de Banque Royale du Canada, utilisée(s) sous licence. © RBC Dominion valeurs mobilières Inc., 2017. Tous droits réservés.


7 important reasons to make a will right now (and what happens if you die without one)

7 important reasons to make a will right now (and what happens if you die without one)

Planning for the future is important for everyone, but it’s especially important if you or someone you care about has dementia. That’s why we’ve partnered with RBC Wealth Management Estate & Trust Services to bring you a series of informative blogs about estate planning. In this blog, Elaine Blades, Senior Manager, Professional Practice Group, RBC Estate & Trust Services, explains why it’s so important for everyone to have a will, and what you risk by not having one.


Elaine Blades

By Elaine Blades, Senior Manager, Professional Practice Group, RBC Estate & Trust Services

More than 50% of Canadians don’t have a will. Chances are, you or someone you care about is one of them. Nobody wants to think about death. But I challenge you to take a moment to consider what you might be risking without a will.

Here are 7 reasons why you need a will:

1) Ensure your wishes are known—and respected

There is a misconception that if you don’t have a will, everything will magically go to your spouse or your children because the law says so. That’s not necessarily the case.

When you die without a will, you are said to have died intestate in the eyes of the law. That means that your estate will be distributed in a standardized way according to the law in your province. These rules—which dictate who gets what, and how much—are non-negotiable.

Everyone’s situation is unique, and it’s likely that your wishes won’t match up with the arbitrary formula used by your provincial government. What do I mean? Suppose you have two children and one of them has special needs. Or, say you lent one of your children money over the course of their lifetime. In each case, an unequal distribution is something you likely would have wanted in your will.

Without a will, you risk that your assets could go to someone you hadn’t intended—or worse, someone you wanted to receive something may get nothing at all. Blended families, for example, are increasingly common and can present complexities for estate planning. Preparing a will gives you the peace of mind that your wishes will be legally recognized and properly executed.

2) Take care of your partner

Another common misconception is that your partner is automatically entitled to a portion of your estate. In some provinces, this depends on whether or not you are legally married.

When you die without a will, your surviving married spouse is entitled to a portion (if not all) of the estate. But in certain provinces, such as Ontario, a common-law spouse has no rights when their partner dies without a will. They may qualify as a dependent and be able to make a claim for support, but they have no automatic entitlement the way a legally married spouse would. They can make a claim as a dependent, but the process is no walk in the park—it can be long, expensive, and create friction with the other beneficiaries of the estate.

Regardless of your relationship’s legal status, it’s important to have a will to ensure that your partner receives the assets of your choosing. Otherwise, it is left up to the arbitrary rules of your provincial government.

3) Decide who will care for your children (or other dependents)

Did you know that the only place you can appoint guardians for your children or dependents is in your will? Should you die without a will and leave behind minor children or dependents, it’s up to the government to appoint someone to care for them—and it may not be the person you would have chosen.

In the absence of a will, provincial laws also determine how much money goes to your children. Until they reach the age of majority, though, your children can’t access those funds, and your spouse doesn’t have an automatic right to access them, either. Your spouse would need to apply to court to access the money on the children’s behalf, and would be accountable to the courts for how that money is spent.

With a will in place, all of this can be avoided. As well as appointing guardians, preparing a will allows you to establish Trusts for your children and dependents (and even for pets!) You can also appoint a Trustee to manage the Trust until your children turn 18. By documenting all of these decisions in your will, you can have the peace of mind that your children or dependents will be taken care of the way you want.

4) Avoid unnecessary headaches for those you leave behind

Administering an estate is no easy task—and without a will, it’s even harder.

When you die without a will, you miss the opportunity to appoint an Executor to administer your estate. Without an Executor, no one has an automatic right to make decisions for your estate. This may create a difficult situation for your family, who will face a number of administrative and legal hurdles as they attempt to manage your estate. Until someone is appointed by the courts to administer your estate, your assets (including bank accounts, stocks, and investments) can’t be accessed. Things like automatic monthly payments couldn’t be cancelled, and if the markets were to turn, investments couldn’t be liquidated to mitigate loss.

The process for a family member to get the authority to administer your estate can be time-consuming and expensive. The person appointed by the courts may not be the best person for the job, or who you would have wanted. Each province has a priority list for who has the right to apply to be the Executor. Generally speaking, a spouse would have the first right to apply to be the Executor, followed by adult children.

Another stressor comes from the fact that without a will, many decisions will have to be determined by the courts. This sometimes has the unfortunate effect of pitting family members against each other, as they each try to advocate for what they think is best and what they believe you would have wanted. By preparing a will and making your wishes clear, you can make an already difficult time less difficult for those you leave behind.

5) Minimize taxes on your estate

Without a will, you miss opportunities to plan in ways that can be advantageous for your estate. Although the basic rules for tax on your estate are the same whether you die with or without a valid will, estate planning, including making a will, offers you the chance to minimize income taxes and probate fees for your estate. Leaving a gift to charity in your will, for example, could be claimed against your tax bill. A good financial professional can help you understand the rules and talk through your options.

6) Save time and money in the long-run

While the up-front cost of a will might put some people off, preparing a will saves you and your estate in the long-run. Without a will, what may take you five hours with a professional will take your loved ones days, even weeks of legal work. As mentioned, when no Executor is appointed through a will, the process of distributing your estate is immediately longer and costlier. The time you spend with a professional upfront allows you to save time for those you leave behind and save money for your estate, by avoiding legal proceedings and taking advantage of tax planning opportunities.

7) Remember your favourite charities

Leaving a planned gift to a charitable organization is something many of us do to recognize causes we believe in. Without a will, there is no way to ensure that your philanthropic wishes are carried out precisely as you would like them to be. If your charity of choice changes its name or its focus, for example, you may not have the necessary details in place to ensure that your gift remains with them or goes to another organization. Talking through your options and wishes with an estate professional and incorporating this into your will ensures that you can leave the kind of legacy you wish to.

You can learn more about leaving a gift to the Alzheimer Society in your will at alzheimer.ca/giftinyourwill.


Making a will is one of the most important things you’ll ever do. Why delay? Take the first step towards preparing your will by downloading the Alzheimer Society’s Will Planning Checklist and check out these other great estate planning resources.


This document has been prepared for use by the RBC Wealth Management member companies, RBC Dominion Securities Inc.*, RBC Phillips, Hager & North Investment Counsel Inc., Royal Trust Corporation of Canada and The Royal Trust Company (collectively, the “Companies”) and certain divisions of the Royal Bank of Canada. *Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Each of the Companies and the Royal Bank of Canada are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. The information provided in this document is not intended as, nor does it constitute, tax or legal advice. The information provided should only be used in conjunction with a discussion with a qualified legal, tax or other professional advisor when planning to implement a strategy. ® / TM Trademark(s) of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. ©Royal Bank of Canada 2017. All rights reserved.


Rédiger un testament

7 raisons importantes de rédiger un testament dès à présent… et les conséquences de ne pas le faire.

Prévoir son avenir est important pour tous, mais ça l’est particulièrement si vous ou une personne dont vous prenez soin est atteinte d’une maladie cognitive. C’est pourquoi nous avons établi un partenariat avec les services Gestion de patrimoine, successions et fiducies de la banque RBC pour vous proposer une série de blogues informatifs sur la planification successorale. Dans ce blogue, Elaine Blades, la gestionnaire principale du groupe Pratique professionnelle des services Successions et fiducies de la banque RBC, explique pourquoi il est si important d’avoir un testament… et ce que vous risquez si vous n’en avez pas.


Elaine Blades

Par Elaine Blades, gestionnaire principale, Groupe des pratiques professionnelles, Successions et fiducies à la banque RBC

Plus de la moitié des Canadiens n’ont pas de testament. Il y a de fortes chances que vous ou une personne dont vous vous souciez soit dans ce cas. Personne ne veut penser à la mort, mais je vous mets au défi de réfléchir à ce que vous risquez sans testament.

Voilà 7 bonnes raisons de rédiger un testament :

1) S’assurer que vous souhaits soient connus — et respectés

Une idée fausse consiste à croire qu’en l’absence de testament, tout reviendra comme par magie, à votre conjoint(e) ou à vos enfants, parce que la loi le précise. Ce n’est pas forcément le cas.

Aux yeux de la loi, si vous mourez sans testament, on dit que vous êtes décédé intestat. Cela signifie que votre patrimoine sera réparti d’une manière standardisée selon les lois de votre province. Ces règles qui régissent combien et ce qui revient à chacun ne sont pas négociables.

La situation de chacun est unique. Et il y a fort à parier que vos souhaits ne seront pas ceux de la formule arbitraire utilisée par votre gouvernement provincial. Qu’est-ce que cela signifie concrètement? Supposons que vous ayez deux enfants et que l’un d’entre eux à des besoins spéciaux. Supposons encore que vous ayez prêté de l’argent à l’un de vos enfants au cours de sa vie. Dans chaque cas, il y a de bonnes chances que vous auriez voulu indiquer dans votre testament que votre patrimoine soit distribué de manière inégale.

Sans testament, vous courrez le risque que vos actifs reviennent à une personne que vous n’aviez pas envisagée; pire encore : une personne à qui vous vouliez donner quelque chose pourrait ne rien recevoir du tout. Par exemple, les familles reconstituées sont de plus en plus répandues. Elles peuvent présenter certaines difficultés en matière de planification successorale. Préparer un testament vous donne la garantie de savoir que vos souhaits seront reconnus juridiquement et correctement exécutés.

2) Prendre soin de votre conjoint

Une autre idée fausse consiste à croire que votre partenaire a automatiquement droit à une partie de votre patrimoine. Dans certaines provinces, cela dépend de si vous êtes légalement mariés ou non.

Si vous mourez sans testament, le conjoint marié qui vous survit a droit à une partie (sinon à la totalité) du patrimoine. Mais dans certaines provinces, comme en Ontario, un conjoint de fait n’a aucun droit en cas de décès sans testament du partenaire. Il pourrait se qualifier comme personne à charge et réussir à faire une demande de soutien, mais il ne jouit d’aucun droit automatique comme dans le cas d’un conjoint légalement marié. Il peut faire une demande comme personne à charge, mais la démarche n’est pas une partie de plaisir : elle peut être longue, couteuse et semer la discorde entre les autres bénéficiaires du patrimoine.

Indépendamment du statut juridique de votre relation, il est important d’avoir un testament pour que votre partenaire reçoive les actifs que vous choisissez. Sinon, il sera assujetti aux règles arbitraires de votre gouvernement provincial.

3) Décider qui prendra soin de vos enfants (ou d’autres personnes à charge)

Saviez-vous que votre testament est l’unique document dans lequel vous pouvez nommer des tuteurs pour vos enfants ou les personnes qui sont à votre charge? Si vous décédez sans testament et que des enfants mineurs ou des personnes à charge vous survivent, il appartient au gouvernement de nommer quelqu’un qui s’en occupera… et cette personne pourrait être différente de la personne que vous auriez choisie.

En l’absence de testament, les lois provinciales déterminent également la somme d’argent qui revient à vos enfants. Jusqu’à ce qu’ils atteignent leur majorité, les enfants ne peuvent toutefois pas accéder à ces fonds et votre conjoint ne jouit pas automatiquement du droit à y accéder non plus. Votre conjoint devra faire la demande auprès du tribunal pour avoir accès à l’argent au nom des enfants et il sera responsable devant le tribunal de la manière dont les fonds sont dépensés.

En étant muni d’un testament, tout cela peut être évité. Comme la nomination de tuteurs, la rédaction d’un testament vous permet de préparer des fiducies pour vos enfants et les personnes qui sont à votre charge (même pour les animaux domestiques!) Vous pouvez également nommer un administrateur qui gérera la fiducie jusqu’à ce que votre enfant atteigne l’âge de 18 ans. En documentant toutes ces décisions dans votre testament, vous pouvez avoir l’esprit tranquille : vos enfants ou les personnes qui sont à votre charge seront pris en charge de la manière que vous le souhaitez.

4) Éviter les casse-têtes inutiles pour les personnes que vous quittez

Administrer un patrimoine n’est pas une chose aisée. Et, sans testament, c’est encore plus difficile.

En mourant sans testament, vous manquez l’opportunité de nommer un exécuteur testamentaire pour gérer votre patrimoine. Sans celui-ci, personne ne peut automatiquement disposer du droit de prendre des décisions concernant votre patrimoine. Cela pourrait donner lieu à une situation difficile au sein de votre famille qui fera face à un certain nombre d’obstacles administratifs et juridiques, tandis qu’ils essaient de gérer votre patrimoine. Jusqu’à ce que quelqu’un soit nommé par les tribunaux pour administrer votre patrimoine, personne ne peut accéder à vos actifs (y compris, vos comptes en banque, actions et investissements). Les paiements mensuels automatiques, par exemple, ne pourraient être annulés, et, si les marchés financiers venaient à tourner, il serait impossible de liquider vos actifs pour limiter les pertes.

Le processus pour qu’un membre de la famille ait l’autorité d’administrer votre patrimoine peut prendre du temps, être onéreux et fastidieux. La personne nommée par les tribunaux pourrait ne pas connaître celle plus adéquate pour cette tâche, ou celle que vous aviez en tête. Chaque province dispose d’une liste de priorités permettant de savoir qui a le droit de déposer une demande pour être exécuteur testamentaire. De manière générale, un conjoint aurait la priorité, suivi des enfants adultes.

Un autre facteur de stress est le fait que sans testament, de nombreuses décisions devront être prises par les tribunaux. Parfois, cela a le malheureux effet de tourner les membres des familles les uns contre les autres, car ils pourraient essayer de défendre ce qu’ils pensent être le mieux ou ce qu’ils pensent que vous auriez souhaité. En préparant un testament et en identifiant clairement vos souhaits, vous pouvez alléger le fardeau des personnes que vous quittez.

5) Minimiser les impôts sur votre patrimoine

Sans testament, vous laissez passer l’opportunité de pouvoir planifier de manière avantageuse pour votre patrimoine. Bien que les règles de base relatives aux impôts soient les mêmes, que vous mouriez avec ou sans testament valable, la planification successorale y compris la rédaction du testament, vous donne la chance de minimiser vos impôts sur le revenu ainsi que les frais d’homologation de votre patrimoine. Par exemple, faire un don testamentaire pour un organisme de bienfaisance pourrait être déduit de vos impôts. Un bon professionnel des services financiers peut vous aider à comprendre les règles et vous expliquer les options qui s’offrent à vous.

6) Économiser de l’argent et du temps sur le long terme

Bien que les coûts initiaux d’un testament puissent être déstabilisants, la rédaction d’un testament vous fera économiser du temps et de l’argent sur le long terme. Sans testament, ce qui ne vous prendrait que 5 heures avec un professionnel prendrait aux êtres qui vous sont chers des jours, voire des mois de travail juridique. Comme mentionné, lorsqu’aucun exécuteur testamentaire n’est mentionné dans le testament, le processus de distribution du patrimoine est immédiatement plus long et plus couteux. Le temps que vous passez avec un professionnel dès le départ permet aux personnes que vous laissez derrière vous d’économiser du temps et vous permet d’économiser des fonds sur votre patrimoine en évitant les procédures judiciaires et en tirant profit des opportunités de planification fiscale.

7) Se souvenir de ses œuvres de bienfaisance préférées

Bon nombre d’entre nous font un don planifié à un organisme de bienfaisance pour honorer des causes dans lesquelles nous croyons. Sans testament, il est impossible que vos souhaits philanthropiques soient réalisés exactement comme vous le souhaitez. Si l’organisme de bienfaisance de votre choix change de nom ou d’objectif, par exemple, vous n’aurez peut-être pas les détails nécessaires en place pour vous assurer que votre don leur soit encore attribué. Discuter de vos options et de vos souhaits avec un professionnel et les inclure dans votre testament vous garantira de pouvoir laisser le type de succession que vous souhaitez.

Apprenez-en davantage sur comment faire un don testamentaire pour la Société Alzheimer à alzheimer.ca/dontestamentaire.


La rédaction d’un testament est l’une des choses les plus importantes que vous aurez à faire. Pourquoi la retarder? Faites le premier pas pour préparer votre testament en téléchargeant la Liste de contrôle de planification testamentaire de la Société Alzheimer et découvrez ces autres excellentes ressources concernant la planification successorale.


Ce document a été préparé(e) pour les sociétés membres de RBC Gestion de patrimoine, RBC Dominion valeurs mobilières Inc.*, RBC Phillips, Hager & North Services-conseils en placements inc., Société Trust Royal du Canada et Compagnie Trust Royal (collectivement, les « sociétés »). * Membre–Fonds canadien de protection des épargnants. Chacune des sociétés et Banque Royale du Canada sont des entités juridiques distinctes et affiliées. Les renseignements fournis dans ce document ne constituent pas des conseils fiscaux ou juridiques et ne doivent pas être interprétés comme tel. Les renseignements fournis ne doivent servir qu’à des fins de discussion avec un conseiller juridique ou fiscal qualifié ou un autre conseiller professionnel pour la planification de la mise en œuvre d’une stratégie. ® / MC Marque(s) de commerce de Banque Royale du Canada, utilisée(s) sous licence. © RBC Dominion valeurs mobilières Inc., 2017. Tous droits réservés.

How do you want to leave your financial legacy?

How do you want to leave your financial legacy?

Planning for the future is important for everyone, but it’s especially important if you or someone you care about has dementia. That’s why we’ve partnered with RBC Wealth Management Estate & Trust Services to bring you a series of informative blogs about estate planning.

In this blog, Leanne Kaufman, Head of RBC Estate & Trust Services, asks ‘What kind of financial legacy do you want to leave behind?’

Read More Read More

What will your legacy be?

What will your legacy be?

Death is a fact of life. Because the transition from life to death is an unknown, humans are full of fear. And fear drives us to avoidance. Even though there has been increasing media attention to end-of-life issues recently, we seem to live in a death-phobic, death-avoidance culture. While our television, movie and video game screens are often filled with images of violent death. And news reports remind us every day of various threats to life.

Can we shift our perceptions to think about our Legacy instead of our deaths? May is Leave a Legacy month in Canada.

May is national LEAVE A LEGACY™ month across Canada. LEAVE A LEGACY™ is a national public awareness program designed to encourage Canadians to leave a gift, primarily through their Will, to a charity of their choice and to raise awareness of the importance of including a charitable gift in the estate-planning process.

The main goal of estate planning is usually to have the greatest amount of one’s estate pass to the owner’s intended beneficiaries. This includes paying the least amount of taxes. A legacy gift can benefit your favourite charity while significantly helping your family save taxes.

We are living in a time when an unprecedented amount of wealth is being transferred from one generation to the next. According to the Canadian Association of Gift Planners, in the next two decades 3.5 million Canadians are expected to die, leaving an estimated $1.5 trillion to their families and community.

Recent data on estate planning

A recent Scotiabank study found that half (50 per cent) of Canadians have a Will and just over half of Canadians (54 per cent) said they have spoken to their family about their intentions for their Will. The study also found that only one third (33 per cent) of Canadians have a Power of Attorney for property, while 59 per cent do not have one and 8 per cent say they don’t know what it is.

The disturbing part is that 50 per cent of Canadians currently don’t have a Will. According to the LEAVE A LEGACY™ program, if this trend continues, about two million Canadians over the next two decade will end life without a Will to protect their assets and their families. Without a Will, people lose the ability to control distribution of their estate to their chosen beneficiaries!

A common myth is people think you have to be wealthy to make a legacy gift—this is simply not true. Anyone can arrange to leave a charitable gift from their estate, regardless of its size.

People give for many different reasons; to ensure their memory lives on, to ensure that their favorite charity is able to continue its important work, to minimize the tax liability that comes with the transfer of one’s estate to surviving family members.

You have the ability to help the lives of people with dementia and create a lasting legacy. Gifts left to the Alzheimer Society of Ontario gives us the security of future funds. This May, get into action, do your Will, leave a legacy and create a brighter future for communities across Canada. We are here to help, request our free Super Hero Estate Planner and Guide. Not all Super Heroes wear capes. At the Alzheimer Society our Super Heroes leave a gift in their Wills to fight our #1 foe – dementia. Take a stand. Get the job done. Protect and help others and gain peace of mind. To learn more, and to request a free estate planner and guide, go to alzsuperhero.ca

 

Written by:

Colleen Bradley Chief Development Officer, Planned Giving Alzheimer Society of Ontario
Colleen Bradley
Chief Development Officer, Planned Giving Alzheimer Society of Ontario

 

What do you want YOUR legacy to be?

What do you want YOUR legacy to be?

For those of us working for a charity, the word “legacy” means a thoughtful charitable gift, a gift left in your Will. But there could be another meaning: how did you show up in the world?

In other words, aside from the dollars distributed from your estate, how do you want to be remembered? What do you want YOUR legacy to be?

How do you show up in the world? Most of us strive to be the best possible person we can in daily life. We aim to be productive, giving, and caring people who cause as little pain as possible to others when travelling on our own path. Some of us volunteer; others donate to important causes.

What do you want YOUR legacy to be? I was recently asked this question by our CEO, Chris Dennis. In the 26 years that I have been working in the charitable sector in estate planning, this was the first time I had ever been asked that question! So I have to admit, I needed a moment to reflect.

When speaking with donors who want to give a charitable gift in their Wills, I usually ask that early in our conversations. So I asked myself more of the same questions I pose to donors: What’s important to you? What are your core values, the beliefs you have woven into the fabric of your daily living? What do you think your purpose is for being here? And perhaps the most interesting question of all was: What’s missing? Is there anything else you could be doing while you’re healthy, happy and alive?’

Getting back to Chris a few days later, I said I wanted to create a Centre of Fundraising Excellence at the Alzheimer Society as part of my legacy. If I was going to take on the responsibilities of Chief Development Officer, I wanted to build a strong foundation of revenue to fight our foes of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. I wanted to educate people on why they need to overcome procrastination and complete their Powers of Attorneys and Wills. And I wanted to work with a team that strove to be the best.

When I reflected on my personal life, I know I have fallen a bit short of my goal of ensuring that the people I care for most know of how much I love and appreciate them. Yes, I tell my family and friends that I love them all the time, but I believe “deeds speak.” I noticed that there is room for improvement in my actions there and other areas too. And then it hit me: my legacy is a work in progress. I create my legacy moment by moment, day by day, by being intentionally aware of what I am creating, and who I choose to create it with.
So what do you want YOUR legacy to be?

I’d like to invite you to consider your personal legacy. How do you show up in the world? How do you treat yourself, others, your communities, and the planet? What gets in your way? What would it take to align your beliefs and words with simple actions? Your actions today, like completing an estate plan, can ensure others will be protected and thrive long after you leave this earth.

I invite you to create a strong personal legacy that includes cherished memories along with the dollar legacy you leave in your estate plans. Because in the end, it will be how people ‘remember’ us that will truly matter.
If you would like to share your thoughts on this blog, please email me at cbradley@alzheimeront.org.

Learn more about Make a Will Month.

IMG_4846 (edited)-2Colleen Bradley

Chief Development Officer, Planned Giving