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Falls and Dementia: What You Need to Know

Falls and Dementia: What You Need to Know

 As the weather gets colder and the ground freezes over, we all start to feel a little unsteady in our footing. But for people living with dementia, the fear of falling can be more than an occasional thought in the wintertime. November is Fall Prevention Month, and we want to discuss why, for older adults and people living with dementia, falls are an everyday worry. In fact, falls can be dangerous, if not deadly. The concern of falling isn’t one…

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Can meditation slow down cognitive decline? Neuropsychologist Dr. Carol Hudon and Psychologist Dr. Sonia Goulet aim to find out

Can meditation slow down cognitive decline? Neuropsychologist Dr. Carol Hudon and Psychologist Dr. Sonia Goulet aim to find out

Memory lapses in early stage Alzheimer’s disease have been linked to depression, anxiety, and stress. As recipients of a Quality of Life research grant through the Alzheimer Society Research Program (ASRP), Hudon and Goulet want to know if mindfulness meditation cannot only relieve those symptoms, but if it might actually slow down cognitive decline. This year, the ASRP celebrates 29 years of funding Canadian researchers in the field of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Through the results of their research,…

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This February, put your brain health first

This February, put your brain health first

February is National Heart Health month, and did you know your heart and brain health are directly related? As part of the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA), researcher Dr. Carol Greenwood and her team have been studying how lifestyle can become a risk factor for dementia, and whether changes to lifestyle – even later in life – can lower that risk. “Thankfully, we can say that lifestyle, which includes activity and diet, absolutely impacts both the heart and…

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“People living with Alzheimer’s disease are still people”

“People living with Alzheimer’s disease are still people”

Two Alzheimer’s diagnoses, decades apart, show how much has changed—and how much stays the same—when a family navigates dementia. Sharon and her mother, Esther, were very close. “My mother and I used to talk three times each day. One of the first signs that my mother might have dementia was when I noticed she would forget to call me.” The warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease were well-known to Sharon; it wasn’t the first time that her family had received the…

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What would you ask a researcher?

What would you ask a researcher?

These people have told us what they would say to a researcher. Here’s a sneak peak of what they asked to get you thinking: what would you say? Stay tuned for more in September. How is the work you are doing connecting to all the other work going on? Everyone shouldn’t be working in silos.                                                                                         Julie Foley, caregiver                                                                                    …

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Introducing the 2015 Alzheimer Society Research Program (ASRP) Community Representatives / Des représentants de la collectivité participent au Programme de recherche de la Société Alzheimer (PRSA)

Introducing the 2015 Alzheimer Society Research Program (ASRP) Community Representatives / Des représentants de la collectivité participent au Programme de recherche de la Société Alzheimer (PRSA)

This year the Alzheimer Society celebrates 27 years of funding research through the Alzheimer Society Research Program (ASRP). The peer review panel meetings were held in February 2015 in Toronto, Ontario, and included the role of Community Representatives. Community Representatives are members of the general public who are not currently involved with research who are given the opportunity to comment on the intent, purpose and on the clarity of the language used within the lay summaries of research applications that…

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Photos from #SeedsofHope day

Photos from #SeedsofHope day

On May 16th, over 1200 people across Ontario planted #SeedsofHope for a world without Alzheimer’s disease. Here are some photos from the day.

Lynn volunteers as a Support Group Facilitator

Lynn volunteers as a Support Group Facilitator

After Lynn Silver’s mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, Lynn wanted to get involved with the Alzheimer Society in some way. She sought out a volunteer opportunity and has now been a Support Group Facilitator with the Alzheimer Society for the past three years. Lynn facilitates a Support Group at St Basil’s Ukrainian Catholic Church on Harcourt St in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The group meets the fourth Thursday of every month. “I continue to volunteer because I know how challenging of…

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Introducing the 2014 Alzheimer Society Research Program (ASRP) Community Representatives / Des représentants de la collectivité participent au Programme de recherche de la Société Alzheimer (PRSA)

Introducing the 2014 Alzheimer Society Research Program (ASRP) Community Representatives / Des représentants de la collectivité participent au Programme de recherche de la Société Alzheimer (PRSA)

This year, for the very first time, the Alzheimer Society Research Program (ASRP) invited Community Representatives to participate in the peer review process. Community Representatives are members of the general public who are not currently involved with research. They comment on the intent, purpose and on the clarity of the language used within the lay summaries of the research applications. Their involvement in peer review serves as a mechanism for public accountability by providing feedback on the ASRP peer review process.

Reduce your risk by boosting your brain health

Reduce your risk by boosting your brain health

It’s never too soon, or too late to make changes that will maintain or improve your brain health, changes that may also help reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias. Train your brain. Keeping your body active makes you strong – same thing goes for your brain. Try new things. Challenge your mind with games, puzzles and crosswords. Visit a museum, take a class, play an instrument. Think, connect and engage. Stay in touch. Social interaction appears…

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